The San Diego Film Critics Society Honors The Irishman


The San Diego Film Critics Society announced their picks for the best of 2019 earlier today!

And here they are!

(Check out a list of the nominations here!)

Best Picture

  • Winner: THE IRISHMAN
    Runner Up: MARRIAGE STORY

Best Director

  • Winner: Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie, UNCUT GEMS
    Runner Up: Noah Baumbach, MARRIAGE STORY

Best Actor

  • (TIE) Adam Driver, MARRIAGE STORY Joaquin Phoenix, JOKER

Best Actress

  • Winner: Lupita Nyong’o, US
    Runner Up: Renée Zellweger, JUDY

Best Supporting Actor

  • (TIE) Joe Pesci, THE IRISHMAN & Brad Pitt, ONCE UPON A TIME… IN HOLLYWOOD

Best Supporting Actress

  • Winner: Zhao Shuzhen, THE FAREWELL
    Runner Up: Laura Dern, MARRIAGE STORY

Best Comedic Performance

  • Winner: Wesley Snipes, DOLEMITE IS MY NAME
    Runner Up: Taika Waititi, JOJO RABBIT

Best Original Screenplay

  • Winner: Noah Baumbach, MARRIAGE STORY
    Runner Up: Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie, UNCUT GEMS

Best Adapted Screenplay

  • Winner: J.C. Lee, Julius Onah, LUCE
    Runner Up: Steven Zaillian, THE IRISHMAN

Best Documentary
Runner Up: LOVE, ANTOSHA

  • Winner: ONE CHILD NATION

Best Animated Film

  • Winner: I LOST MY BODY
    Runner Up: TOY STORY 4

Best Foreign-Language Film

  • Winner: PARASITE
    Runner Up: TRANSIT

Best Costume Design

  • Winner: Ruth E. Carter, DOLEMITE IS MY NAME
    Runner Up: Anna Robbins, DOWNTON ABBEY

Best Editing

  • Winner: Andrew Buckland, Michael McCusker & Dirk Westervelt, FORD V FERRARI
    Runner Up: Benny Safdie, Ronald Bronstein, UNCUT GEMS

Best Cinematography

  • Winner: Jarin Blaschke, THE LIGHTHOUSE
    Runner Up: Roger Deakins, 1917

Best Production Design

  • Winner: Dennis Gassner, 1917
    Runner Up: Jess Gonchor, LITTLE WOMEN

Best Visual Effects

  • Winner: AD ASTRA
    Runner Up: 1917

Best Use of Music

  • Winner: ONCE UPON A TIME… IN HOLLYWOOD
    Runner Up: JOJO RABBIT

Best Ensemble

  • Winner: KNIVES OUT
    Runner Up: THE IRISHMAN

Breakthrough Artist

  • Winner: Florence Pugh, LITTLE WOMEN, MIDSOMMAR
    Runner Up: Kelvin Harrison Jr., LUCE, WAVES

6 Good Films That Were Not Nominated For Best Picture: The 1960s


Sonny and Cher walk down the 1968 Oscars Red Carpet

Continuing our look at good films that were not nominated for best picture, here are 6 films from the 1960s.

Psycho (1960, dir by Alfred Hitchcock)

The director was nominated.  Janet Leigh was nominated.  Amazingly enough, Anthony Perkins was not nominated for playing the role that would come to define him.  And, in the end, the film itself was not nominated for best picture.  Perhaps it was too sordid for the Academy.  Perhaps they resented no longer feeling safe in the shower.  Regardless, Psycho has gone on to influence every horror thriller made since 1960.  And let’s not even talk about how much we all cried while watching the finale of Bates Motel.

From Russia With Love (1963, dir by Terence Young)

The first great James Bond film should have also been the first Bond film to be nominated for best picture.  Actually, looking over the films that actually were nominated in 1963, From Russia With Love should have been the first Bond film to win best picture.

Blow-Up (1966, dir by Michelangelo Antonioni)

Mimes playing tennis and David Hemmings briefly breaking out of his shell of ennui to investigate a murder that has no solution!  How could the Academy resist?  Somehow, they did.  Michelangelo Antonioni received a nomination but the film was, at the time, considered to be too controversial to nominate.

The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (1967, dir by Sergio Leone)

Though initial reviews were mixed, Sergio Leone’s Civil War epic has come to be recognized as one of the greatest and most important Westerns of all time.  Perhaps it’s understandable that the Academy of 1967 would be skeptical of an Italian western starring Clint Eastwood, Eli Wallach, and Lee Van Cleef.  Still, it would have been one of the coolest best picture nominees of all time.  (Shockingly, not even Ennio Morricone’s iconic score was nominated.)

Petulia (1968, dir by Richard Lester)

Though Richard Lester will probably always be best known as the man who directed the first two Beatles films, he also directed one of the definitive 60s films, Petulia.  Sadly, in a year when many lackluster films were nominated, the challenging and rather melancholy Petulia was not.

Night of the Living Dead (1968, dir by George Romero)

Again, we really can’t be shocked that the Academy held off an recognizing a low-budget, independent film about zombies  But come on!  A Night of the Living Dead vs. Petulia Oscar race would have bene one for the ages.

Up next, in an hour or so, the 1970s!