Music Video of the Day: Going Down To Liverpool by The Bangles (1984, dir. Tamar Hoffs)


Today would have been Leonard Nimoy’s birthday. I thought it would be fun to spotlight that other music video he did a little over 25 years prior to the one for Bruno Mars. The big question is why he did it. It’s simple. He was friends with the Hoffs. Susanna’s mom directed the video. It was produced by Matthew Hintlian.

That’s it. It’s a very simple video that is worth watching because you have The Bangles confusing and annoying Leonard Nimoy. I never thought I would be writing that sentence.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: Take A Chance On Me by ABBA (1978, dir. Lasse Hallström)


When I started out doing this retrospective, I wanted to get at least as far as this music video. Unfortunately, after 37 ABBA, and ABBA related music videos, I don’t have anything grand to say about it. Still, I can talk about some of the interesting aspects of it.

When you start it up, you are immediately greeted with The Brady Bunch split screen.

Note the crazy eyes on Frida. She does this several times during the video. Why? I don’t know. Why does she jump around at one point?

Maybe that’s jumping for joy.

Take another look at the screenshot of the beginning of the video. Do you see how Agnetha and Frida aren’t doing the same thing? It’s a small detail, but an apt way to describe this music video is that it is all about details. You’ll notice that throughout the video, they are usually doing their own thing instead of carefully moving into certain positions. You still get some of that with shots like this one below.

But you get a lot of shots like this one below where they are doing different things.

While I’m bringing that up, take a look at this shot.

The mark to tell Agnetha and Frida where to stop is visible at Agnetha’s foot. Mistake? Maybe it is since you can also see that the far left has visible black area where the backdrop didn’t reach. You don’t see the mark again in the video. I like to think of it as something left in intentionally by Hallström.

The video is made up of a lot of elements from previous music videos, but there are little changes. The jump cuts are the most obvious. In general, the editing in this video is much more like what you would expect from music videos that would arrive with the birth of MTV.

Another interesting one is changing up the singing head-shot of Agnetha. We get the standard one early on that we are familiar with from videos like SOS. Then it is followed with one where we get Agnetha sweeping upwards from the lower right-hand corner of the screen to do her bit before swinging her head backwards to reveal that spotlight we saw in Money, Money, Money.

One of my favorite things is when Benny springs up from his seat to chase after Frida.

Another thing about the video is that we get a little cutaway to a part where Frida is listening to music while Benny reads a magazine.

Its inclusion ties together a lot of the elements the audience would be familiar with from other ABBA music videos.

Something that isn’t familiar are the the camera movements. You can see the camera move in quickly to follow Frida to Benny sitting on a chair.

You also get shots where the camera moves upwards, and visa versa. It’s interesting how it will come down to, and move towards either Agnetha or Frida. This also happens the other way around as it returns to a shot of both of them.

The last thing I want to bring up is that you’ll notice that there are numerous times Agnetha turns around, or comes close to doing so. The video ends with the back of her head. I love it.

I think that’s it. Enjoy this landmark music video!

ABBA retrospective:

  1. Bald Headed Woman by The Hep Stars (1966, dir. ???)
  2. En Stilla Flirt by Agnetha & ??? (1969, dir. ???) + 8 Hootenanny Singers Videos From 1966
  3. Tangokavaljeren by Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  4. Vårkänslor (ja, de’ ä våren) by Agnetha & Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  5. Titta in i men lilla kajuta by Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  6. Nu Ska Vi Vara Snälla by Björn & Agnetha (1969, dir. ???)
  7. Finns Det Flickor by Björn & Sten Nilsson (1969, dir. ???)
  8. Nu Ska Vi Opp, Opp, Opp by Agnetha (1969, dir. ???)
  9. Det Kommer En Vår by Agnetha (1969, dir. ???)
  10. Beate-Christine by Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  11. En Stilla Flirt by Agnetha & ??? (1969, dir. ???) + 8 Hootenanny Singers Videos From 1966
  12. Att Älska I Vårens Tid by Frida (1970, dir. ???)
  13. Min Soldat by Frida (1970, dir. ???)
  14. Söderhavets Sång by Frida (1970, dir. ???)
  15. Ring, Ring by ABBA (1973, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  16. Ring, Ring by ABBA (1973, dir. ???)
  17. Love Isn’t Easy (But It Sure Is Hard Enough) by ABBA (1973, dir. ???)
  18. Waterloo by ABBA (1974, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  19. Hasta Mañana by ABBA (1974, dir. ???)
  20. I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  21. I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do by ABBA (1975, dir. ???)
  22. Bang-A-Boomerang by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  23. SOS by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  24. Mamma Mia by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  25. Knowing Me, Knowing You by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  26. Tropical Loveland by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  27. When I Kissed The Teacher by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  28. Tiger by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  29. Money, Money, Money by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  30. Money, Money, Money by ABBA (1976, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  31. Fernando by ABBA (1976, dir. Lasse Hallström) + Spanish Version
  32. Dancing Queen by ABBA (1976, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  33. That’s Me by ABBA (1977, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  34. Knowing Me, Knowing You by ABBA (1977, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  35. The Name Of The Game by ABBA (1977, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  36. Thank You For The Music/Gracias Por La Música by ABBA (1977/1978, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  37. One Man, One Woman by ABBA (1978, dir. Lasse Hallström)

Music Video of the Day: Since You’ve Been Gone by Rainbow (1979, dir. Ken Walz)


What is with some music videos not letting the thumbnail go through to an embed? You can see a less complete, but better looking version below that does display its thumbnail. They are both here at the time I am writing this, which is the day before this post goes live.

Okay, I think I can make this have to do with my current ABBA retrospective and tie in with Power Rangers (2017).

The first is obvious. I know next to nothing about Mighty Morphin Power Rangers except that they are multi-colored. Thus, Rainbow. Much like Power Rangers, the group has gone through so many different people that someone on Wikipedia put this chart together.

Second, this song was originally written by Argent guitarist Russ Ballard. You can hear his version below.

Russ Ballard would go on to write I Know There’s Something Going On for Frida and Can’t Shake Loose for Agnetha. That’s the ABBA connection.

The director of Power Rangers is Dean Israelite who was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. After the Russ Ballard version, Since You’ve Been Gone was covered by South African band Clout. You can hear two versions from them below. One appears to be the original, and the other for a more recent album.

It shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that lead-singer Cindy Alter was also born in Johannesburg.

There are my connections to ABBA and the new Power Rangers movie. But there’s other interesting information about the song and music video.

The song would also go on to be covered by Cherie and Marie Currie.

I like this version because they turned it into a duet. It’s tough to beat Graham Bonnet’s vocals on Rainbow’s version, so I like their different take on it. Brian May of Queen would also cover it later with his own band.

The director of the video is Ken Walz. He did most of his work in music videos as a producer. Notably, he produced Girls Just Wanna Have Fun and Time After Time by Cyndi Lauper. Both of them were directed by Edd Griles who also directed several music videos for Rainbow. Ken Walz also directed I Know What Boys Like by The Waitresses, along with a few others.

I love connections.

My favorite connection via the song is that you can tie Black Sabbath to The Righteous Brothers via Rainbow covering it. Ronnie James Dio fronted Black Sabbath after Ozzy Osbourne. Rainbow’s original vocalist was Ronnie James Dio. The original version of this song was produced by Roger Glover. Clout covered Substitute by The Righteous Brothers and this song. Roger Glover was the bassist for Rainbow during this period.

My favorite connection via the music video is that you can tie Rainbow to Pierce Brosnan’s wife Keely Shaye Brosnan. This music video was directed by Ken Walz. Ken Walz produced The Heart Of Rock And Roll by Huey Lewis & The News. The music video for Stuck With You by Huey Lewis & The News starred Keely Shaye Brosnan.

Add the two together with TV, and you can even bring Black Sabbath together with the short-lived sitcom My Two Dads, since Cyndi Lauper had a reoccurring role on Mad About You and Paul Reiser was on both shows (Black Sabbath->Ronnie James Dio->Rainbow->Edd Griles->Cyndi Lauper->Mad About You->Paul Reiser->My Two Dads).

Enjoy the song and music video.

Music Video of the Day: Born To Rock by Buck Dharma (1982, dir. Richard Casey)


I brought it up the other day, so let’s do Born To Rock by Buck Dharma, aka that guy you probably know from Blue Öyster Cult.

Oh, so YouTube comment sections exist in this music video.

No Rock Music?!? This is worse than when Hell froze over in 2005 and…

One Way Ticket by The Darkness

One Way Ticket by The Darkness

The Darkness had to run from a metaphor for cocaine to thaw it out.

One Way Ticket by The Darkness

What’s this?

Buck Dharma. Born To Rock. Wanted Dead or Alive. Contact U.S. Marshall S. Pearlman out of Oyster Bay, NY? Harsh! Buck does one solo album, and Blue Öyster Cult manager Sandy Pearlman is fine if he is brought in dead? He was tough back then. Also yes, Buck was born on Long Island, NY where Oyster Bay is located.

There’s only one man who can possibly bring him down. I dub him Blue Öyster Max.

Even his car says he is “2BADD”.

Now we get Buck delivering himself. My best guess is that this shot…

is a reference to Buck having given up getting a degree in Chemical Engineering to go into music. Then for some reason, None Dare Call It Treason by John A. Stormer has to do with Buck’s birth.

I haven’t read the book, but the summary on Amazon makes it sound like it would have been right up Ronald Reagan and Estus Pirkle’s alley. Pirkle also being a Protestant pastor who wrote a book concerning alleged Communist infiltration of America. Except Pirkle went on to adapt his book into a religious exploitation film called If Footmen Tire You, What Will Horses Do? (1971).

I don’t know for sure who that is a picture of in the background while his parents are getting it on. It looks like Eisenhower, but I’m not 100% sure.

There’s other interesting stuff in here that fits with the theme of the music video, but let’s not kid ourselves. You’re watching this music video for the ending showdown between Buck and Blue Öyster Max.

Buck wins, and they rush Blue Öyster Max’s guitar to the hospital. Of course it’s red.

Blue Öyster Max is way dead. Killed by Rock.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: One Man, One Woman by ABBA (1978, dir. Lasse Hallström)


I think Hallström might be Swedish. It’s so hard to tell with this music video.

This one looks like they combined a little footage from a TV performance with shots of their faces. They either fade from one to another or pull a Persona (1966) by dividing the face into two halves made up of two members of the group. It’s a nice and simple video. You’d really have to try hard to convince me that Hallström didn’t have Bergman’s film in mind when he made this video.

Enjoy!

ABBA retrospective:

  1. Bald Headed Woman by The Hep Stars (1966, dir. ???)
  2. En Stilla Flirt by Agnetha & ??? (1969, dir. ???) + 8 Hootenanny Singers Videos From 1966
  3. Tangokavaljeren by Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  4. Vårkänslor (ja, de’ ä våren) by Agnetha & Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  5. Titta in i men lilla kajuta by Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  6. Nu Ska Vi Vara Snälla by Björn & Agnetha (1969, dir. ???)
  7. Finns Det Flickor by Björn & Sten Nilsson (1969, dir. ???)
  8. Nu Ska Vi Opp, Opp, Opp by Agnetha (1969, dir. ???)
  9. Det Kommer En Vår by Agnetha (1969, dir. ???)
  10. Beate-Christine by Björn (1969, dir. ???)
  11. En Stilla Flirt by Agnetha & ??? (1969, dir. ???) + 8 Hootenanny Singers Videos From 1966
  12. Att Älska I Vårens Tid by Frida (1970, dir. ???)
  13. Min Soldat by Frida (1970, dir. ???)
  14. Söderhavets Sång by Frida (1970, dir. ???)
  15. Ring, Ring by ABBA (1973, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  16. Ring, Ring by ABBA (1973, dir. ???)
  17. Love Isn’t Easy (But It Sure Is Hard Enough) by ABBA (1973, dir. ???)
  18. Waterloo by ABBA (1974, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  19. Hasta Mañana by ABBA (1974, dir. ???)
  20. I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  21. I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do by ABBA (1975, dir. ???)
  22. Bang-A-Boomerang by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  23. SOS by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  24. Mamma Mia by ABBA (1975, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  25. Knowing Me, Knowing You by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  26. Tropical Loveland by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  27. When I Kissed The Teacher by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  28. Tiger by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  29. Money, Money, Money by ABBA (1976, dir. ???)
  30. Money, Money, Money by ABBA (1976, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  31. Fernando by ABBA (1976, dir. Lasse Hallström) + Spanish Version
  32. Dancing Queen by ABBA (1976, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  33. That’s Me by ABBA (1977, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  34. Knowing Me, Knowing You by ABBA (1977, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  35. The Name Of The Game by ABBA (1977, dir. Lasse Hallström)
  36. Thank You For The Music/Gracias Por La Música by ABBA (1977/1978, dir. Lasse Hallström)

Music Video of the Day: Fantasy by Aldo Nova (1982, dir. Richard Casey)


My Internet connection appears to be back up for the time being. It went down on the 13th of this month. We had some people come over to start installing new floors in the house that day. Somehow, the instant they walked in the door, the power cutout for all of about 10 seconds. However, that was enough to kick the my Internet connection out, and it didn’t want to come back up. After talking with endless people on the phone and going through three technicians over the past week, they finally were able to find the issue that was keeping the connection down. It was a splitter that breaks up a line coming into the house so that it can go to the modem and a cable box. The splitter had gone bad. After replacing it, I can connect to the Internet again. I would have written a post for yesterday, but the first two technicians also got the modem working again only to have it go down a few hours after they left. I wanted to make sure it would stay up.

I originally thought that I would do The Karate Rap, or one of the two music videos for covers of Chuck Berry’s Johnny B. Goode. I’ll save The Karate Rap, and get to Judas Priest and Peter Tosh later. Instead, I present you Fantasy by Canadian artist Aldo Nova. Let’s see how Wikipedia describes it:

“The video shows Aldo performing with his band at a concert. It is best remembered by fans for its intro, which starts out with a man holding an electric guitar and two bodyguards holding machine guns, waiting for someone. Then comes a helicopter, landing from the sky, and Aldo comes out in a very contoured leopard-print suit, being escorted to the stage. When they encounter a locked door, which the bodyguards can’t open, Aldo grabs his guitar and fires a laser into the door and it opens.”

True. There is the gunfire over the title card implying that Aldo needs to be protected on his way to the stage performance. He does show up in a leopard-print suit. One of the bodyguards tries to knock down the door and fails. Aldo shoots his phaser guitar at the door to open it up. You could take that description, modify it slightly to talk about product placement for Paper Mate mechanical pencils, and you’d have a description of Turn Up The Radio by Autograph. It fails to mention the creative element of the video that pulls it all together.

From the start, it begins to periodically flash quickly to something else, then return to the video. Over the title card, it’s a test pattern. It continues throughout the video until you reach the end where Aldo proceeds to cut in and out of existence till everything else glitches out, and ultimately Aldo does too. In the end, you are left with darkness. The “Fantasy” is over.

The music video was directed by Richard Casey. It looks like he only directed a handful of music videos. They are all pretty trippy. My personal favorite is the post-apocalyptic video for Born To Rock by Buck Dharma. After that, his work is on feature films such as Horror House On Highway Five (1985).

Enjoy!

Musical Sequence of the Day: “Head over Heels” from Donnie Darko (dir by Richard Kelly)


Hi, everyone!

Well, Val is having some internet issues so it’s going to be a few days until she’s able to do another music video of the day.  So, until she returns, I’m going to fill in with some of my favorite cinematic musical sequences!  These are scenes that made brilliant use of music.

And what better way to start things off than with the Head Over Heels scene from 2001’s Donnie Darko.  Directed by Richard Kelly, this scene not only makes brilliant use of the Tears For Fears song, Head Over Heels, but it also manages to introduce every character and set up almost every important relationship in the film.

It’s brilliant but I always find myself wondering what Drew Barrymore had against Sparkle Motion.

To quote Val, “Enjoy!”