Music Video of the Day: Talk by DJ Snake featuring George Maple (2011, dir by Emil Nava)


This video always makes me think of the end of the world.  Maybe that’s the point.  Maybe I’m just fixated on the idea of apocalypse.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: Take A Look At Me Now (Against All Odds) by Phil Collins (1984, dir by Taylor Hackford)


On the one hand, I know that the critics have never exactly embraced the songs of Phil Collins.  I mean, there’s a reason why it’s such a brilliant joke that, in American Psycho, the vacuous wannabe serial killer Patrick Bateman is a rabid Phil Collins fan.  On the one hand, Collins’s music is representative of an era.  On the other hand, it’s often used to illustrate everything that was supposedly wrong with that era.

But you know what?

Screw it.  I like this song.  It’s effective.  It works.  It’s fun to listen to and I’ll probably find myself singing it sometime tonight.  Earlier, I watched a 1984 film called Against All Odds and, when this song played over the final freeze frame, it was a perfect moment.

The video for Take A Look At Me Now was directed by the same guy who directed Against All Odds, Taylor Hackford.  Of course, the video itself is mostly made up of clips from the film.  In between Phil doing his thing, we get scenes of Jeff Bridges looking young and sexy, Rachel Ward looking sultry, and James Woods looking dangerous.

The song itself was nominated for an Oscar, though it lost to I Just Called To Say I Love You from The Woman In Red.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: Trouble Town by Jake Bugg (2012, dir by Michael Holyk)


It’s become a bit of a cliché to compare Jake Bugg to Bob Dylan but then you hear a song like Trouble Town and you really don’t have any choice.  Fortunately, it’s a favorable comparison.  The Dylan influence is obvious but Jake Bugg still makes every song his own.

This video was shot in Bugg’s hometown of Clifton, Nottingham.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: Born Slippy by Underworld (1996, dir by ?????)


Hi, everyone!

I don’t have much to say about this video, beyond the fact that I love the song.  Yesterday, I posted a video for this song that was released to go along with the 2015 re-release of Underworld’s Second Toughest In The Infants.  This, however, is the original video that was released for Born Slippy.

If the 2015 video celebrates Born Slippy as an athem, this video treats it as a very personal portrayal of emotion.

Enjoy!