6 Shots From 6 Films: Special Darren Aronofsky Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

Today, the Shattered Lens wishes a happy 52nd birthday to one of our favorite filmmakers, Darren Aronofsky!  When we first started this site, we were eagerly awaiting the release of Black Swan.  Now, ten years alter, we’re eagerly awaiting the release of Aronofsky’s next film, whatever it may be.

In honor of the birthday of a true visionary director, here are….

6 Shots From 6 Films

Pi (1998, dir by Darren Aronofsky, DP: Matthew Libatique)

Requiem for a Dream (2000, dir by Darren Aronofsky, DP: Matthew Libatique)

The Wrestler (2008, dir by Darren Aronofsky, DP: Maryse Alberti)

Black Swan (2010, dir by Darren Aronosfky, DP: Matthew Libatique)

Noah (2014, dir by Darren Aronofsky, DP: Matthew Libatique)

mother! (2017, dir by Darren Aronofsky, DP: Matthew Libatique)

 

6 Shots From 6 Films: Special King Vidor Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

Today, we celebrate the 127th birthday of Texas-born filmmaker, King Vidor!  Though Vidor may no longer be a household name, he was one of the most important and idiosyncratic filmmakers of Hollywood’s Golden Age.  The Crowd is regularly cited as one of the most influential films ever made.  (Certainly every film that’s ever featured a shot of an anonymous office worker sitting in a room full of cubicles owes a debt to it.)  Duel in the Sun went on to inspire countless spaghetti westerns.  The Fountainhead is also regularly cited as a favorite by a surprisingly large number of directors.

In honor of King Vidor’s life and legacy, here are….

6 Shots From 6 King Vidor Films

The Crowd (1928, dir by King Video, DP: Henry Sharp)

The Champ (1931, dir by King Vidor, DP: Gordon Avil)

Duel In The Sun (1946, dir by King Vidor, DP: Lee Garmes)

The Fountainhead (1949, dir by King Vidor, DP: Robert Burks)

War and Peace (1956, dir by King Vidor, DP: Jack Cardiff)

Solomon and Sheba (1959, dir by King Vidor, DP; Fred A. Young)

 

4 Shots From 4 Films: Special Greydon Clark Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

Today, Through the Shattered Lens wishes a happy 78th birthday to the one-of-a-kind director, Greydon Clark!  And that means that it’s time for….

4 Shots From 4 Greydon Clark Films

Angels Brigade (1979, dir by Greydon Clark, DP: Dean Cundey)

Without Warning (1980, dir by Greydon Clark, DP: Dean Cundey)

Final Justice (1985, dir by Greydon Clark, DP: Nicholas Josef von Sternberg)

The Forbidden Dance Is Lambada (1990, dir by Greydon Clark, DP: R. Michael Stringer)

6 Shots From 6 Films: Special François Truffaut Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

The great François Truffaut was born 89 years ago today, in Paris, France.  This French director would go on to prove that cinema is a universal language and it’s hard not to think about what type of films Truffaut would have gone on to make, if not for his tragically early death at the age of 52.  As far as I am concerned, today is a holiday dedicated to one of the most important cinematic voices of all time.

In honor of the life and legacy of François Truffaut, here are:

6 Shots From 6 François Truffaut Films

The 400 Blows (1959, dir by François Truffaut, DP: Henri Decae)

Shoot the Piano Player (1960, dir by François Truffaut, DP: Raoul Coutard)

Fahrenheit 451 (1966, dir by François Truffaut, DP: Nicolas Roeg)

Day For Night (1973, dir by François Truffaut, DP: Pierre-William Glenn)

The Story of Adele H. (1975, dir by François Truffaut, DP: Nestor Almendros)

The Last Metro (1980, dir by François Truffaut, DP: Nestor Alemndros)

6 Shots From 6 Films: Special John Ford Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

John Ford was born 127 years ago today, in Maine.  Seeing as how John Ford is one of the most influential and important directors of all time, it was pretty much guaranteed that we were going to share a few shots from his filmography on the Shattered Lens.  As a challenge to myself, I decided that I would only picks shot from Ford’s non-westerns.

However, I then remembered just how much I love The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance and that plan pretty much went out the window.

Anyway, in honor of John Ford, here are….

6 Shots From 6 Films: Special John Ford Edition

The Informer (1935, dir by John Ford, DP: Joseph H. August)

The Long Voyage Home (1940, dir by John Ford. DP: Gregg Toland)

The Grapes of Wrath (1940, dir by John Ford. DP: Gregg Toland)

They Were Expendable (1945, dir by John Ford. DP: Joseph H. August)

The Quiet Man (1952, dir by John Ford, DP: Winton C. Hoch)

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962, dir by John Ford. DP: William H. Clothier)

4 Shots From 4 Films: Special Norman Mailer Edition


Norman Mailer, running for mayor of New York City in 1969

4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

Norman Mailer wasn’t just a writer and symbol of New York City.  He was also an aspiring filmmaker, a director who made three experimental films in the 60s and one studio film in the 80s.  And while none of his films could really be described as being a hit with either audiences or critics, they do — to a certain extent — epitomize an era.  Plus, the story of Rip Torn hitting Mailer with a hammer during the filming of Maidstone will live forever.

In honor of Norman Mailer the director, here are….

4 Shots From 4 Norma Mailer Films

Wild 90 (1968, dir by Norman Mailer, DP: D.A. Pennebaker)

Beyond The Law (1968, dir by Norman Mailer, DP: D.A. Pennebaker)

Maidstone (1970, dir by Norman Mailer, DP: D.A. Pennebaker)

Tough Guys Don’t Dance (1987, dir by Norman Mailer, DP: Mike Moyer and John Bailey)

 

4 Shots From 4 Films: Special Michael Anderson Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

101 years ago today, Michael Anderson was born in London.  Anderson may have never become a household name but he directed some memorable movies.  Around The World in 80 Days proved that audiences love spectacle and celebrity cameos and it won the Oscar for Best Picture of 1956.  (Though Anderson was nominated for best director, the award went to George Stevens for Giant.)  However, I think that Anderson’s best-remembered film is probably Logan’s Run.  Whenever I shout, “I hate outside!” or I reply to a simple question with, “There is no sanctuary,” people always seem to automatically know which film I’m referencing.  Anderson followed up Logan’s Run with Orca, which is one of the better Jaws rip-offs.

Today, we honor the career and legacy of Michael Anderson with….

4 Shots From 4 Michael Anderson Films

Around The World in 80 Days (dir by Michael Anderson, DP: Lionel Lindon)

Logan’s Run (1976, dir by Michael Anderson, DP: Ernest Laszlo)

Orca (1977, dir by Michael Anderson, DP: J. Barry Herron and Ted Moore)

The Martian Chronicles (1980, directed by Michael Anderson, DP: Ted Moore)

4 Shots From 4 Films: Special Ernst Lubitsch Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

129 years ago today, Ernst Lubitsch was born in Germany.  It was in Germany where he first started his directorial career, directing his first silent film in 1918.  He came to Hollywood in 1922 and continued to work as a director up until he suffered a sudden and fatal heart attack in 1947.  Lubitsch was famed for the “Lubitsch touch,” which could roughly be translated into the fact that he made sophisticated, sexually-charged comedies for adults.  During the Depression, he provided audiences with an escape from the drudgery of everyday life.  Lubitsch brought the comedy of manners to Hollywood and his influence is still felt to this day.

In honor of Ernst Lubitsch’s career and cinematic legacy, here are….

4 Shots From 4 Ernst Lubitsch Films

Rosita (1923, dir by Ernst Lubitsch, DP: Charles Rosher)

One Hour With You (1931, dir by Ernst Lubitsch, DP: Victor Milner)

Trouble In Paradise (1932, dir by Ernst Lubitsch, DP: Victor Milner)

The Merry Widow (1934, dir by Ernst Lubitsch, DP: Oliver T. Marsh)

4 Shots From 4 Films: Special Henry King Edition


Henry King (1886 — 1982)

4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

Henry King was born 135 years ago today.  He was born in Virginia and, though he may no longer be a household name, he was one of the busiest and most versatile directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age.  He began his career during the silent era, directing his first film in 1918.  He continued to work all the way through 1962, working in every genre and directing at least 8 Oscar-nominated performances.  He was also one of the founders of the Academy.  In short, Henry King was an important figure in the early years of Hollywood.  If you’ve ever studied classic film or just spent a weekend or two watching TCM, there’s a good chance that you’ve seen at least one Henry King film.

Like many of the top directors from Hollywood’s Golden Age, Henry King was prized for being a professional.  In the years when the studios ruled Hollywood and before directors became known as auteurs, King was someone who could be trusted to make an effective film with the minimum amount of behind-the-scene drama.  He was someone who could move from genre to genre and from theme to theme.  He was skilled at getting the best performances from his actors and he knew how to visually tell a story and keep the action moving.  He knew how to engage the audience and his best films hold up surprisingly well.

In honor of Henry King and his career and legacy, here are…

4 Shots From 4 Henry King Films

Tol’Able David (1921, dir by Henry King, DP: Henry Cronjager)

In Old Chicago (1938, dir by Henry King, DP: J. Peverell Marley)

The Song of Bernadette (1943, dir by Henry King, DP: Arthur C. Miller)

David and Bathsheba (1951, dir by Henry King. DP: Leon Shamroy)

4 Shots From 4 Films: Special Radley Metzger Edition


4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films is just what it says it is, 4 (or more) shots from 4 (or more) of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 (or more) Shots From 4 (or more) Films lets the visuals do the talking.

92 years ago today, Radley Metzger was born in New York, New York.  After serving as a photographer in the U.S. Air Force, Metzger went into film distribution.  He brought European “art” films to the United States and booked them in various grindhouse theaters.  Like so many film distributors and producers, Metzger eventually realized that he could make a lot more many by making his own films.  In the late 60s and the early 70s, Metzger was one of the pioneers of what would eventually become known as “porno chic.” He directed adult films that were distinguished by their strong sense of composition, intelligent storylines, and their sense of characterization.  Remember in Boogie Nights, when Burt Reynolds said that he wanted to make real films that just happened to feature graphic sex?  Well, Radley Metzger actually did that.

Unfortunately, Metzger’s films were a bit too arty for the adult crowd and too explicit for the mainstream critics. Still, over the years, Metzger’s work has been rediscovered and appreciated by open-minded film lovers and by people like me who just happen to like artistically-minded decadence.

Today, we honor Radley Metzger with….

4 Shots From 4 Films

Carmen, Baby (1967, dir by Radley Metzger, DP: Hans Jura)

Camille 2000 (1969, dir by Radley Metzger, DP: Ennio Guarnieri)

The Lickerish Quartet (1970, dir by Radley Metzger. DP: Hans Jura)

Score (1974, dir by Radley Metzger, DP: Frano Vodopivec)