New Movie Posters for you to see (With trailers included!)


I know, I know, I have been away from posting my normal movie previews and reviews for a while, that is my fault!

But I’ll be back to posting my normal movie previews/reviews soon!

Until then here are some things you can look forward to me previewing and reviewing:

A Perfect Host

2020 movie posters

Alien OutBreak

Alien outbreak

Covenant

Covenant

 

And last, but not least, You might have been…

Stalked

Hope you all enjoyed my tour through my movie screeners I get to watch this month!

4 Shots From 4 Jim Jarmusch Films: Permanent Vacation, Stranger Than Paradise, The Limits Of Control, Only Lovers Left Alive


4 Shots From 4 Films is just what it says it is, 4 shots from 4 of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 Shots From 4 Films lets the visuals do the talking!

Happy birthday, Jim Jarmusch!

4 Shots From 4 Jim Jarmusch Films

Permanent Vacation (1980, dir by Jim Jarmusch)

Stranger Than Paradise (1984, dir by Jim Jarmusch)

The Limits of Control (2009, dir by Jim Jarmusch)

Only Lovers Left Alive (2013, dir by Jim Jarmusch)

7 Films That David Lynch Turned Down


Let us take a moment to consider the career of David Lynch.

As we all know, David Lynch is one of America’s most unique and idiosyncratic directors, an unapologetic surrealist whose films always seem to come from a very dark and very personal place.  He began his career with Eraserhead and was then brought to Hollywood by Mel Brooks so that he could direct The Elephant Man.  Following the huge success of The Elephant Man, Lynch signed a contract with Dino De Laurentiis and directed Dune (a movie that Lynch later said was as close as he ever came to “selling out”) and the far better received Blue Velvet.

After the success of Blue Velvet, Lynch turned to television.  Twin Peaks was, in its way, Blue Velvet adapted for network television.  While people across the world were debating who killed Laura Palmer, Lynch won the 1990 Palme d’Or with Wild At Heart.  Frustrated with ABC’s attempts to interfere with the direction of Twin Peaks, Lynch became less involved with the televisions series and it was canceled after its second season.  Lynch’s cinematic prequel, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, was released an initially tepid response, though — like much of Lynch’s work — it has since been positively reevaluated.

In 1997, Lynch directed his most surreal film yet, Lost Highway.  He then shocked critics by directing the G-rated The Straight Story and proving that his surreal vision could be heart-warming as well as frightening.  When Lynch couldn’t get a network to commit to his proposed second televisions series, Lynch filmed some more footage and released the pilot as a feature film.  Mulholland Drive has gone on to be recognized as one of the greatest films of all time and it also earned Lynch his third Oscar nomination for Best Director.

Despite the success of Mulholland Drive, Lynch still struggled to find the financial backing for the films that he wanted to make.  In 2006, he directed Inland Empire, a film that’s as surreal as any that he’s ever directed and also, in its way, one of the most emotionally powerful films ever made.  Again, much like Fire Walk With Me and Lost Highway, Inland Empire was initially dismissed by critics but it has since been rediscovered.

Eat My Fer by David Lynch

Following Inland Empire, Lynch focused on painting, music, and promoting meditation and it was feared that he had retired from filmmaking.  In 2017, he brought Twin Peaks: The Return to Showtime and, for a few brief months, we were again enraptured by his genius.

David Lynch has directed ten feature films.  (Eleven, if you count Twin Peaks: The Return.  I do.)  He has one of the greatest filmographies of any living director.  But what about the films that David Lynch didn’t make?  In his memoir, Room to Dream, Lynch wrote about not only the projects for which he couldn’t find backing but also about several films that he was offered but turned down.

Here are a few of the films David Lynch turned down:

  1. Frances (1982)

Frances Farmer was a Golden Age actress who was famous for her refusal to conform to the demands of 1940s society.  She was outspoken in her political views.  She drank heavily.  She was open about her drug use.  Following the end of her affair with playwright Clifford Odets, Farmer had a nervous breakdown and was sent to a draconian mental hospital where she was horrifically abused, suffered through electroshock treatments, and was eventually lobotomized before being released in 1950.

It’s a pretty disturbing story and one can imagine that Lynch could have made a powerful film out of it, especially as Frances Farmer is the archetype for the troubled women who are often at the center of his films.  Mel Brooks, who also produced The Elephant Man, produced Frances and was hopeful that Lynch would direct it.  However, Lynch had already signed a contract with Dino De Laurentiis and was not available.  Frances was eventually directed by Graeme Clifford, who took a far more straight-forward approach to the material than Lynch would have.

2. Return of the Jedi (1983)

This is probably the most famous of the films that David Lynch turned down.  George Lucas was a fan of Eraserhead and, in the early 80s, Lynch was riding high as a result of having received his first Oscar nomination for The Elephant Man.  Reportedly, Lucas actually did offer the film to Lynch.  Lynch turned him down, saying that he felt that the film would ultimately have been seen as being Lucas’s film and not the film of whoever was hired to direct it.  Instead, Lynch directed another sci-fi epic, Dune.  

Lucas reportedly then offered the film to another maverick director, David Cronenberg.  After Cronenberg turned it down, Lucas settled on Richard Marquand.

3. Tender Mercies (1983)

Robert Duvall won his first Oscar for this film, in which he played an alcoholic country singer who finds redemption with a Texas widow and her son.  This rather gentle film may seem like the furthest thing one would associate with Lynch but I personally think that David Lynch could have done a good job with it.  Tender Mercies is a film that feels like it might be distantly related to The Straight Story and Lynch’s unapologetic love of Americana would have served the story well.

Lenny Von Dohlen, who played a small role in Tender Mercies, later played the shut-in who had Laura Palmer’s diary in Twin Peaks.

4. Manhunter (1986)

Also known as Red Dragon, this film was the first to feature Dr. Hannibal Lecter.  The film was offered to Lynch by Dino De Laurentiis.  Lynch turned it down so he could concentrate on Blue VelvetManhunter was instead directed by Michael Mann, who — it must be said — filled the film with surreal imagery that occasionally felt very Lynchian.  Considering that Lynch’s films are full of flamboyantly evil men, it’s hard not to be curious what Lynch would have done with characters like Hannibal Lecter and Francis Dollarhyde.

5. American Beauty (1999)

American Beauty was one of the many scripts that was sent to Lynch in the 90s.  Lynch turned the film down and it was instead made by Sam Mendes.  American Beauty went on to win Best Picture.  That said, it’s also one of the most pretentious film ever made and the fact that some people love it will never cease to amaze me.  Interestingly, one of the main problems with the film is that, as a director, Mendes often tries too hard to capture the mood and feeling that Lynch was later able to so effortlessly create in Twin Peaks: The Return.  Lynch probably could have made a decent film out of American Beauty but, fortunately for us, he devoted his attention to Mulholland Drive instead.

6. The Ring (2002)

This film was offered to Lynch but he turned it down. (Interestingly enough, when the film was made, it starred Naomi Watts, who had just appeared in Mulholland Drive and who went on to appear in both Inland Empire and Twin Peaks: The Return.)  I would have been curious to see what Lynch would have done with the killer video.

7. Motherless Brooklyn (2019)

In 1999, Lynch was among the directors who Edward Norton approached about directing a film version of the just-published detective novel, Motherless Brooklyn.  Lynch, who was working on Mulholland Drive, turned Norton down.  20 years later, Motherless Brooklyn was finally made into a film, with Norton starring and directing.

It’s hard to guess what the future holds for David Lynch.  There have been reports that Lynch will no longer make films though Lynch himself says that his disillusionment with cinema has been overstated.  There are also rumors that Lynch might give us another season of Twin Peaks.  Who knows?  Even if David Lynch spends the rest of his days promoting transcendental meditation and never again steps behind a camera, no one can deny that he’s given us some of the most amazing and important films of all time.  Happy birthday, Mr. Lynch!

 

 

The SAG Honors Parasite and All The Usuals.


The SAG Awards were held tonight.  I did not bother to watch them but apparently, a good time was had by all.  Parasite won the award for Best Ensemble, which is the SAG equivalent for Best Picture.  (1917, which won at the PGA  Awards earlier this week, was not nominated for the Ensemble award.)  This might mean that Parasite is the new front runner for Best Picture or it might not.  Do you remember what won last year?  Black Panther.

(I’m a little bit surprised that SAG didn’t go for Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, which is is a film about actors.  I mean, Birdman won a prize it didn’t deserve by appealing to the ego of actors.  Then again, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood centers on an actor whose career is going downhill so maybe it hits too close to home.)

Joaquin Phoenix, Renee Zellweger, Brad Pitt, and Laura Dern won the acting prizes and I imagine that they’ll repeat at the Oscars.  To be honest, it’s hard for me to remember who else is nominated in any of those categories.

Avengers: Endgame won for Best Stunt Ensemble.  Why isn’t their an Oscar category for Best Stunts?  Seriously, that’s messed up.

Anyway, here’s your list of film winners.  They also gave out some TV awards but, to be honest, who cares about that in January?  The Emmys are over!  If you want to see a full list of winners, click here or do a google search.  Whatever works for you.

Best Ensemble — Parasite

Best Actor — Joaquin Phoenix, Joker

Best Actress — Renee Zellweger, Judy

Best Supporting Actor — Brad Pitt, Once Upon A Time In Hollywood

Best Supporting Actress — Laura Dern, Marriage Story

Best Stunt Ensemble — Avengers: Endgame

The Producers Guild of America Honors 1917


Last night, I heard that the PGA had honored 1917 as the best film of 2019 and I thought to myself, “Well, that’s good for the golfers but since when did they become film experts?”

This morning, I woke up and I realized that the PGA was the Producer’s Guild of America, which means that 1917‘s victory is now officially a big deal.  If Sam Mendes wins at the DGA, I would imagine that would mean that 1917 is officially unstoppable as far as the Oscars are concerned.  Of course, just yesterday, I was saying that the Eddie Awards had made Parasite into an unstoppable Oscar winner.

So, maybe I know what I’m talking about and maybe I don’t.

Anyway, the PGA gave out a lot of awards last night but here are the three that you need to know while making your Oscar predictions:

Best Feature Film — 1917

Best Animated Film — Toy Story 4

Best Documentary Film — Apollo 11

(Apollo 11 was, incredibly, not nominated for Best Documentary.)

For a full list of the PGA winners, click here.

4 Shots From 4 Cary Grant Films: The Awful Truth, The Philadelphia Story, North by Northwest, Charade


4 Shots From 4 Films is just what it says it is, 4 shots from 4 of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 Shots From 4 Films lets the visuals do the talking!

Today is the 116th anniversary of one of the greatest stars of Hollywood’s Golden Age, Cary Grant!  And that means that it’s time for….

4 Shots From 4 Cary Grant Films

The Awful Truth (1937, dir by Leo McCarey)

The Philadelphia Story (1940, dir by George Cukor)

North by Northwest (1959, dir by Alfred Hitchcock)

Charade (1963, dir by Stanley Donen)

The ACE Eddie Awards Honor Parasite and Jojo Rabbit


Last night, the ACE Eddie Awards — which are meant to recognize the best edited films of the previous year — were given out.  Parasite took the award for Best Edited Drama while Jojo Rabbit won for Best Edited Comedy.

If you’re an Oscar watcher, this is a big deal.  Parasite is the first non-English language film to win the top prize at the Eddie Awards and it’s victory might indicate that the Academy might be more open to rewarding (as opposed to just nominating) an international film than many people have assumed.  Meanwhile, Jojo Rabbit defeated Once Upon A Time In Hollywood would might suggest that Hollywood doesn’t have the inside track that many people, like me, assumed that it did.

So, this could all mean something or it might mean nothing.  That’s the way these precursors go and I’ll be the first to admit that amateur awards watchers, like me, are often too quick to try to read huge significance into every single precursor.  We’ll see what happens when the Oscars are handed out on February 9th!

For now, here are the Eddie Winners!

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (DRAMA)

Ford v Ferrari
Michael McCusker, Andrew Buckland

The Irishman
Thelma Schoonmaker

Joker
Jeff Groth

Marriage Story
Jennifer Lame

Parasite – WINNER
Jinmo Yang

BEST EDITED FEATURE FILM (COMEDY):

Dolemite Is My Name
Billy Fox

The Farewell
Michael Taylor, Matthew Friedman

Jojo Rabbit – WINNER
Tom Eagles

Knives Out
Bob Ducsay

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
Fred Raskin

BEST EDITED ANIMATED FEATURE FILM:

Frozen 2
Jeff Draheim

I Lost My Body
Benjamin Massoubre

Toy Story 4 – WINNER
Axel Geddes

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE):

American Factory
Lindsay Utz

Apollo 11 – WINNER
Todd Douglas Miller

Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice
Jake Pushinsky, Heidi Scharfe

Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
David J. Turner, Thomas G. Miller

BEST EDITED DOCUMENTARY (NON-THEATRICAL):

Abducted in Plain Sight
James Cude

Bathtubs Over Broadway
Dava Whisenant

Leaving Neverland
Jules Cornell

What’s My Name: Muhammad Ali – WINNER
Jake Pushinsky

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Better Things: “Easter” – WINNER
Janet Weinberg

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend: “I Need To Find My Frenemy”
Nena Erb

The Good Place: “Pandemonium”
Eric Kissack

Schitt’s Creek: “Life is a Cabaret”
Trevor Ambrose

BEST EDITED COMEDY SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Barry: “Berkman”
Kyle Reiter

Dead to Me: Pilot
Liza Cardinale

Fleabag: “Episode 2.1” – WINNER
Gary Dollner

Russian Doll: “The Way Out”
Todd Downing

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Chicago Med: “Never Going Back To Normal”
David J. Siegel

Killing Eve: “Desperate Times” – WINNER
Dan Crinnion

Killing Eve: “Smell Ya Later”
Al Morrow

“Mr. Robot”: “Unauthorized”
Rosanne Tan

BEST EDITED DRAMA SERIES FOR NON-COMMERCIAL TELEVISION:

Euphoria: Pilot
Julio C. Perez IV

Game of Thrones: “The Long Night” – WINNER
Tim Porter

Mindhunter: Episode 2
Kirk Baxter

Watchmen: “It’s Summer and We’re Running Out of Ice”
David Eisenberg

BEST EDITED MINISERIES OR MOTION PICTURE FOR TELEVISION:

Chernobyl: “Vichnaya Pamyat” – WINNER
Jinx Godfrey, Simon Smith

Fosse/Verdon: “Life is a Cabaret”
Tim Streeto

When They See Us: Part 1
Terilyn A. Shropshire

BEST EDITED NON-SCRIPTED SERIES:

Deadliest Catch: “Triple Jeopardy”
Ben Bulatao, Rob Butler, Isaiah Camp, Greg Cornejo, Joe Mikan

Surviving R. Kelly: “All The Missing Girls”

Stephanie Neroes, Sam Citron, LaRonda Morris, Rachel Cushing, Justin Goll, Masayoshi
Matsuda, Kyle Schadt

Vice Investigates: “Amazon on Fire” – WINNER

Cameron Dennis, Kelly Kendrick, Joe Matoske, Ryo Ikegami