Music Video of the Day: Get Rhythm by Ry Cooder (1988, dir. David Fincher)


Once again, we have club-owner Stanton, but back in the 1980s before he played a club owner in Stop by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. This time he is under the direction of none other than David Fincher. I didn’t expect to hit a David Fincher music video while going through ones with Harry Dean Stanton.

It’s a shame that the version I found has such a low resolution. I mean there isn’t anything particularly interesting about the video. It’s one of those where a band starts playing to a nearly empty place and people keep trickling in until the club is packed because they can’t resist the pull of the song. But still, you can tell that it probably looked really good when it was shown properly.

What happened to the parrot between shots?

Enjoy!

Harry Dean Stanton Retrospective:

  1. Those Memories Of You by Dolly Parton & Linda Ronstadt & Emmylou Harris (1987, dir. White Copeman)
  2. Heart Of Stone by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  3. Sorry You Asked? by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  4. Nothing To Believe In by Cracker (1996, dir. Samuel Bayer)
  5. Stop by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (2003, dir. Charles Mehling)
  6. Dreamin’ Of You by Bob Dylan (2008, dir. ???)
Advertisements

Music Video of the Day: Dreamin’ Of You by Bob Dylan (2008, dir. ???)


I wanted to do a different music video today, but it’ll have to come in the following days due to health issues. On the upside, those health issues might have left another music video with Harry Dean Stanton in it go unfound. Or is that a downside? Yes, I found another one, and I’ll take it as a good thing.

Anyways, this time we get bootlegger-Stanton.

We get to see him travel around following Dylan to bootleg his songs.

I think it’s clever the way they did this video. According to Wikipedia, it did get an official release:

It was originally recorded to be on the 1997 album Time Out Of Mind. You remember Time Out Of Mind, right? That was the album that took Dylan to the Grammy Awards so he could meet the “Soy Bomb”-guy. I’ll always remember that one. The song wasn’t included on the album. It must of leaked out because people had access to it regardless. Cut to almost 10 years later, and Dylan decided to not only release it on an album and call it part of “The Bootleg Series”, but a video was made chronicling the hard life of an old bootlegger.

You’ll notice that Dylan only appears in some grainy stock footage. There’s a comment on YouTube that covers that bit:

A friend of mine called and asked if I wanted to work on a Bob Dylan music video. I said absolutely! However, once we got out to the desert in Palmdale, CA  I said where’s Bob? My buddy said “Dylan, isn’t exactly in the video. The video is a  concept about an old music bootlegger played by Harry Dean Stanton. Bummer. Harry Dean was a trooper, because it was brutally hot at almost 100 degrees. At the end of the day, Harry got on the guitar and played a Mexican folk ballad. He said “film this and send it to Bob.”

I love that story.

This might be my favorite one of the Harry Dean Stanton videos so far. We see this isn’t just a bootlegger. He is a fan who treasures Bob Dylan’s material, would love to be able to play like him, and is so obsessed with Dylan that he appears to have made it his life’s work to make sure not a performance or song is lost to the wind.

As for the album shown at the end, apparently they tried to charge people $18.99 for the two-CD set and the three-CD version for $129.99. Yes, because that’s how to encourage your fans to buy the official release instead of procuring a pirated copy–price gouging.

Enjoy!

Harry Dean Stanton Retrospective:

  1. Those Memories Of You by Dolly Parton & Linda Ronstadt & Emmylou Harris (1987, dir. White Copeman)
  2. Heart Of Stone by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  3. Sorry You Asked? by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  4. Nothing To Believe In by Cracker (1996, dir. Samuel Bayer)
  5. Stop by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (2003, dir. Charles Mehling)

Music Video of the Day: Stop by Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (2003, dir. Charles Mehling)


Hi, club-owner Stanton!

Bye, club-owner Stanton!

What was the point of having him bookend this video? Was the band really big fans of Harry Dean Stanton? Was Stanton a fan?

In between the parts with Stanton, we just get a stylized road trip. There’s nothing particularly interesting about it other than the spin shots. I kind of liked those.

This is one of those videos where I can find quite a few credits.

Charles Mehling directed the video. He has a little over 25 credits as a director of music videos.

Cathy Pellow was the producer. She has a variety of credits spread over work as a video commissioner, executive producer, producer, and director.

Simon Coull was the one who shot it. He appears to have done a little over 10 music videos.

Jeff Seibenick has worked as a director, editor, and cinematographer. He has a bunch of different credits over on IMDb.

Finally, prolific 1st assistant director John Downer worked on this video along with the some 80-90 videos he has done.

Enjoy!

Harry Dean Stanton Retrospective:

  1. Those Memories Of You by Dolly Parton & Linda Ronstadt & Emmylou Harris (1987, dir. White Copeman)
  2. Heart Of Stone by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  3. Sorry You Asked? by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  4. Nothing To Believe In by Cracker (1996, dir. Samuel Bayer)

Music Video of the Day: Those Memories Of You by Dolly Parton & Linda Ronstadt & Emmylou Harris (1987, dir. White Copeman)


Is there a single one of these videos that doesn’t have Harry Dean Stanton playing a sad looking old man?

Spoiler! There’s only one that I can find.

This time around we see Stanton hanging around a black-and-white house with a dog and a fiddle.

While Stanton goes about his normal routine, we see Dolly Parton, Linda Ronstadt, and Emmylou Harris in color as ghosts trolling Stanton. I wonder if this was for the same reason that Bob Dylan wasn’t in the Bob Dylan video that stars Stanton.

Stanton still finds a way to have some enjoyment by doing a bit of Gene Kelly mop/broom dancing from Thousands Cheer (1943).

Thousands Cheer (1943, dir. George Sidney)

Thousands Cheer (1943, dir. George Sidney)

That’s really all there is to the video. It has Stanton and it’s a nice recognizable Country song. Stanton does a fine job as always. I kind of like the idea of Parton, Ronstadt, and Harris being ghosts even if I can’t keep myself from wondering if the video is this way because they couldn’t get them in the same room together. It works anyways.

Unlike almost any video I cover, this one comes with credits.

I can’t find anything about White Copeman except that he seems to have directed at least one other video for Dolly Parton.

There’s a little more information on producer Caldwell. He and his wife sold a house in Venice, Los Angeles back in 2014 for about 2.56 million dollars. I can also find some scattered mentions of him online that amount to the fact that he works as a music video producer. There are at least producing credits on three videos and graphics work on another one.

Enjoy!

Harry Dean Stanton Retrospective:

  1. Heart Of Stone by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  2. Sorry You Asked? by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  3. Nothing To Believe In by Cracker (1996, dir. Samuel Bayer)

Music Video of the Day: Nothing To Believe In by Cracker (1996, dir. Samuel Bayer)


Today’s Harry Dean Stanton video is doubly-sad. That’s because we not only have the recently departed Stanton.

We also have Justin Pierce four years before his suicide. You would know him from Kids (1995).

Talia Shire shows up in the video as well.

I don’t know anyone else in the video other than lead-singer David Lowry. Thank goodness for Wikipedia. I knew of Cracker because of the song Low. I knew of Camper Van Beethoven because of the song Take The Skinheads Bowling. But I would have never noticed that Lowry fronted both bands even though it’s obvious to me now listening to this song and Take The Skinheads Bowling.

I wish I could at least find out who this lady is…

that is doing her best Rob Halford.

Heading Out To The Highway by Judas Priest (1981)

She is prominently featured, but all I could find is that Harry Dean Stanton did two more music videos than I originally thought. It never fails. I’ll do them as well.

The video was directed by Samuel Bayer of…

Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana fame. Did Lowry ask for the Cobain treatment? In addition, I know Bayer directed Bullet With Butterfly Wings one year prior to this one. Still, was Goth-Stanton something people were clamoring for?

I mean he looks like Lars Ulrich in Until It Sleeps.

Until It Sleeps by Metallica (1996)

Yes, that one was also directed by Bayer. And if you are thinking he probably directed some videos for Garbage and Hole based on the woman I couldn’t identify, then you’d be right.

The casting director on this one was Crystal Lujan. Her music video credits alone are close to 100. She has done some acting too. I guess she was one of the cult members in that unfortunate Clive Barker movie with Scott Bakula, Lord Of Illusions (1995).

Enjoy!

Harry Dean Stanton Retrospective:

  1. Heart Of Stone by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)
  2. Sorry You Asked? by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)

Music Video of the Day: Sorry You Asked? by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)


It’s time to pick up with Harry Dean Stanton’s character from Heart Of Stone. This time we find out his name is Bobby Watkins. The video plays the same till about one minute and fifty seconds. That’s where the videos split.

We see Bobby go into the skating rink with two sets of skates, but we’ll soon see that he has no partner for the couples-only skating period.

Bobby starts skating on his own when we get my favorite bit with Stanton. Am I smoking? How did that get there? Let me just toss it like I have no idea where it came from. He also tells him he can’t be out there during couples-only.

Office-guy sits down with Bobby, and he asks what happen to Carolyn. I assume she’s the lady from Heart Of Stone.

That’s when the video launches into the song at close to four minutes into the video. I wonder how much this was edited when it was aired. That’s a lot of build-up regardless of the fact that music plays during it.

This is the better video between this and Heart Of Stone. Not only do we get to see Stanton onstage with Yoakam, but…

we also get a more playful Dwight Yoakam.

It works well in contrast to Stanton.

This works especially well when Yoakam fades his own vocals out at the end before you would expect, and then drops you off emotionally by cutting to Stanton singing the chorus in black-and-white.

This might be my favorite of the Harry Dean Stanton videos. He was a good choice for this even if his age makes Heart Of Stone seem a little ridiculous. That’s assuming I put these in the correct order and that she was supposed to be Carolyn. Enjoy!

Harry Dean Stanton Retrospective:

  1. Heart Of Stone by Dwight Yoakam (1996, dir. Dwight Yoakam)

A Movie A Day #251: Cisco Pike (1972, directed by Bill L. Norton)


Yesterday, the great character actor Harry Dean Stanton passed away at the age of 91.   Cisco Pike is not one of Stanton’s best films but it is a film that highlight why Stanton was such a compelling actor and why his unique presence will be missed.

Cisco Pike (Kris Kristofferson) is a musician who has fallen on hard time.  After having been busted several times for dealing drugs, Cisco now just wants to spend time with his “old lady” (Karen Black) and plot his comeback as a musician.  However, a corrupt narcotics detective, Leo Holland (Gene Hackman), approaches Cisco with an offer that he cannot refuse.  Holland has come into possession of 100 kilos of marijuana.  He wants Cisco to sell it for him and then Leo plans to take the money and retire.  Cisco has the weekend to sell all of the weed.  If he doesn’t, Holland will arrest him for dealing and sent him back to prison,

About halfway through this loose and improvisational look at dealers, hippies, and squares in 1970s Los Angeles, Harry Dean Stanton shows up in the role of Jesse Dupree, an old friend and former bandmate of Cisco’s.  Jesse is a free-living wanderer, too old to be a hippie but too unconventional to be a member of the establishment.  Unfortunately, Jesse also has a nasty heroin habit.  Jesse Dupree is a prototypical Harry Dean Stanton role.  Like many of Stanton’s best roles, Jesse may be sad and full of regrets but he is not going to let that keep him from enjoying life.  Stanton may not appear in much of the film but he still takes over every scene in which he appears.

Stanton is, by far, the best thing about Cisco Pike.  As always, Gene Hackman is entertaining, playing the inverse of The French Connection‘s Popeye Doyle and Karen Black is her usual mix of sexy and weird.  The weakest part of the movie is Kris Kristofferson, who was still a few years away from becoming a good actor when he starred in Cisco Pike.  It is interesting to consider how different Cisco Pike would have been if Stanton and Kristofferson had switched roles.  Stanton may not have had Kristofferon’s movie star looks but, unlike Kristofferson, he feels real in everything that he does.  With his air of resignation and his non-Hollywood persona, Stanton brought authenticity to not only Cisco Pike but to every film in which he appeared.

Along with Stanton, several other familiar faces appear in Cisco Pike.  Keep an eye out for Roscoe Lee Browne, Howard Hesseman, Viva, Allan Arbus, and everyone’s favorite spaced-out hippie chick, the one and only Joy Bang.