Weekly Trailer Round-Up: Dumbo, The Grinch, Unfriended: Dark Web, The Little Stranger, The Nun, The Devil’s Doorway


Lisa asked me to do a round-up of all the trailer that were released this week and the first rule of working at Through the Shattered Lens is that when Lisa asks you to do something, you do it.

To start things off, here’s the trailer that everyone was talking about this week.  Tim Burton’s live action version of Dumbo looks like it could be something special.  I’ve seen a horse fly.  I’ve seen a dragon fly.  I’ve seen a house fly.  And now, on March 29th, 2019, I’ll finally see an elephant fly!

In this next trailer, Benedict Cumberbatch is The Grinch!  On November 9th, The Grinch’s heart will grow by three sizes.  Hopefully, a cardiologist will be on duty.

Unfriended: Dark Web is either a horror sequel or an extended LifeLock commercial.  Unfriended: Dark Web will be infecting a screen near you on July 20th.

Based on the novel by Sarah Waters and directed by Lenny (Room) Abrahamson, The Little Stranger will be visiting theaters on August 31st.

The Nun is being advertised as “the darkest chapter in The Conjuring Universe,” which is apparently now a thing just like the MCU and the DCEU.  Say a prayer for us all because The Nun will be hitting screens on September 7th.

If you liked the trailer for The Nun, you might want to go through The Devil’s Doorway with IFC Midnight on July 13th.

If you survive stepping through The Devil’s Doorway, consider pledging to The Row on July 27th.

And finally, coming to DVD soon, It Came From The Desert!

And that concludes this weekly trailer round-up!

 

A Scene That I Love: The Opening of Scarface


Produced by Martin Bregman, directed by Brian De Palma, written by Oliver Stone, and starring Al Pacino, the 1983 remake of Scarface is one of the best-known, most iconic gangster films ever made.  It opened to mixed reviews but it’s gone on to be recognized as a classic.  Everyone can quote the script:  “Say hello to my little friend!” “In this country, you gotta make the money first. Then when you get the money, you get the power. Then when you get the power, then you get the women.”  “Say goodnight to the bad guy!”

Scarface starts with one of my favorite opening scenes of all time.  Powered by Giorgio Moroder’s score, the opening credits of Scarface play out over footage of the real-life Mariel boatlift.  Combined with footage of Fidel Castro ranting that Cuba does not need the Marielitos, this opening gives real-world credibility to everything that follows.  We then segue from the actual boatlift to Al Pacino as Tony Montana, answering questions with that shit-eating grin on his face.

Listen to the interrogation scene carefully and you’ll hear both Charles Durning and Dennis Franz, dubbing the lines of the actors who played the immigration agents.

4 Shots From 4 Films: In Memory of Martin Bregman


Long-time producer Martin Bregman died yesterday at the age of 92.  Bregman, who started out as a talent agent, was well-known for producing several of Al Pacino’s best films.  This edition of 4 Shots From 4 Films is dedicated to his memory.

4 Shots From 4 Films

Serpico (1973, directed by Sideny Lumet)

Dog Day Afternoon (1975, directed by Sidney Lumet)

Scarface (1983, directed by Brian De Palma)

Carlito’s Way (1993, directed by Brian De Palma)

 

 

Music Video of the Day: Born Slippy by Underworld (1996, dir by ?????)


Hi, everyone!

I don’t have much to say about this video, beyond the fact that I love the song.  Yesterday, I posted a video for this song that was released to go along with the 2015 re-release of Underworld’s Second Toughest In The Infants.  This, however, is the original video that was released for Born Slippy.

If the 2015 video celebrates Born Slippy as an athem, this video treats it as a very personal portrayal of emotion.

Enjoy!

Weekly Reading Round-Up : 06/10/2018 – 06/16/2018


Ryan C.'s Four Color Apocalypse

If it seems like Image Comics is rolling out a new series (be it limited or ongoing) every week — well, that’s because they are. But even by their standards, four in one week is a lot —

Bloodstrike : Brutalists #0 is the one everyone’s been talking about (although that fact was apparently lost on my LCS owner, who ordered precisely one fucking copy — and it was the godawful Rob Liefeld variant, as opposed to the awesomeness shown above), as it brings the punk ‘zine/”alt” comics sensibilities of the great Michel Fiffe (most notably of Copra fame, although my favorite of his works is unquestionably Zegas) crashing headlong into the mercifully-shuttered world of the aforementioned Mr. Liefeld’s Extreme Studios line-up circa about — I dunno, 1996 or some shit. From the book’s numbering to its purposely-stilted dialogue to its admittedly lame core premise (undead heroes who bear…

View original post 957 more words

Lost In America : Nick Drnaso’s “Sabrina”


Ryan C.'s Four Color Apocalypse

We live not just in turbulent times, but significant ones — the ground has shifted beneath our feet, and if you’re American, it’s fair to say that, in many respects, the facade of the country we thought we knew has slipped, and in its place stands revealed a nation that we hoped (or, at the very least, liked to kid ourselves) we weren’t. This is, indeed, a defining moment in our history — but who defines what that moment is?

Nick Drnaso, hot on the heels of his striking 2015 debut graphic novel Beverly, is at least game to give cataloguing the contents of said moment a go in the just-released (by way, once again, of Drawn+Quarterly) Sabrina, and to call this merely a striking follow-up is to sell it well short indeed : this is a quantum leap forward that, fair enough, treads similar thematic ground to…

View original post 931 more words