Let’s Go To The Cities With The Pulps!


by Glen Orbik

With the 4th of July approaching, let’s celebrate the American city with the pulps!  Ever since the early days of the pulp industry, writers and artists have excited readers with stories about the lives of those living in America’s cities.  Here, curtsey of some of the best artists to have worked in the industry, is a pulp-guided tour of those cities!

by Al Rossi

by Barye Phillips

by Barye Phillips

by C.C. Beall

by James Avati

by James Meese

by Lou Marchetti

by Mitchell Hooks

by Owen Kampen

by Rafael DeSoto

by Raymond Johnson

by Robert Maguire

by Robert Schulz

by Robert Stanley

by Rudy Nappi

by Rudy Nappi

by Rudy Nappi

by Stanley Meltzoff

by Victor Olson

by Walter Popp

by William George

Let’s Go Country With The Pulps


With the Fourth of July just a few days away, let’s celebrate the American countryside with the pulps!  From the early days of the pulps, life in rural America has been a favorite subject.  Here are a few portrayals of that life, courtesy of some of the best artists and illustrators to work in the pulp industry!

by James Meese

by Barye Phillips

by Emmett Watson

by George Gross

by Hans Helweg

by James Avati

by James Avati

by Julian Paul

by Paul Rader

by Rafael DeSoto

by Raymond Johnson

by Robert Bonfils

by Robert Bonfils

by Robert Maguire

by Robert McGinnis

by Rudy Nappi

by Sam Cherry

by Samson Pollen

by Saul Levine

by Stanley Zuckerberg

by Victor Kalin

by Walter Popp

Artwork of the Day: The Marriage Rite (by Walter Popp)


by Walter Popp

The Marriage Rite was first published in 1953 by Intimate Novels.  You can probably guess what type of books they published just by the name of their company.  Five years later, the art was reused for the cover of a novel called Wild Oats, which was published by Beacon.  I think The Marriage Rite is a better title than Wild Oats.

“Thou shalt not commit adultery!,” the cover reads, “But if a husband sins, should his wife follow suit?”  Was that the only option available?  The cover also says that this is “a novel of sham passions and triumphant love.”  What are sham passions?

I like the contrast between the swooning lovers and the shocked witness, who I am assuming is the wife.  Is he cheating at home or has his wife followed him to his secret love nest?  His mistress has good fashion sense, combining a green skirt and a red sash with a black top.

This cover was done by Walter Popp, who is one of my favorites.

The Adventures of Steve Harragan and His Eye Patch


Who was Steve Harragan?  He was a hardboiled private investigator who was the main character of a handful of paperback detective novels that were all published in 1952 and 1953.  Though his adventures were not much different from those of any other P.I. of the pulp era, Steve Harragan has a cult following for two reasons.

First off, the author of Harragan’s adventures was also named Steve Harragan.  Did the author Steve Harragan name the character after himself or was “Steve Harragan” just a pseudonym for another author or perhaps several authors?  No one knows for sure, though all of Harragan’s novel were written in the first person.

Secondly, Steve Harragan the Detective only has one eye.  In almost every cover, he’s featured wearing an eye patch.

Here are a few of the Steve Harragan covers.  As always, the artist has been identified when known:

Author Unknown

Author Unknown

Author Unknown

by Bernard Safran

by Walter Popp

Author unknown. I’m not sure which one of these men is meant to be Harragan but you’ll notice that the eyepatch got left out of this cover.