Artwork of the Day: The Pale Blonde of Sands Street (by Earle Bergey)


by Earle Bergey

“Kate picked up a sailor in Brooklyn and was never the same again.”

There’s so many ways to interpret those words that I don’t know if I should be happy for Kate or scared. Luckily “just 12 hours for love” indicates that I should be happy for Kate, even if she was operating under a time limit. I just like how the blurb makes it a point to say that she picked up the sailor “in Brooklyn.” I guess the story would have been different if he was a Staten Island sailor.

This book and cover are from 1950. The artist is Earle Bergey.

Artwork of the Day: La Paree (by Earle Bergey)


by Earle Bergey

This is one of my favorite pulp magazine covers.  She’s got a general, a sailor, a boxer, and Mr. Monopoly all on the same string!  Which one is her dream man?  I’m guessing Mr. Monopoly because he gets $200 every time he passes go.

La Paree was published from 1930 to 1938.  This issue is from October of 1935 and for a quarter, readers could learn how she managed to get all those men on the same string.  This cover was done by Earle Bergey, an artist who has been featured on this site many times in the past and who will probably be featured many more times in the future.

Artwork of the Day: Sport Story Magazine (by Earle Bergey)


by Earle Bergey

Happy Super Bowl Sunday!

This issue of Sport Story Magazine is from 1936.  As you can tell from the Earle Bergey-illustrated cover, football used to look much different.  I don’t know if those leather hats provided much protection.

Lt. Col. Gar Davidson, who wrote the featured story “How the Army Plays Football” was the coach of West Point’s football team.  He coached from 1933 to 1937 and compiled a 35-11-1 record.  Later, from 1956 to 1960, he served as the Superintendent of the United States Military Academy.

The Thrilling Covers of Thrilling Wonder Stories


Thrilling Wonder Stories was a pulp magazine that was published from 1936 to 1955.  It was one of several pulp magazines that had the word “thrilling” in its title.  The stories were mostly science fiction and I guess they were meant to be more thrilling than all of the other science fiction that was being published at the same time.  The stories were apparently thrilling enough for the magazine to run for 19 years.

Below are a few of the covers of Thrilling Wonder Stories, done by some of the best artists of the pulp era.

by Earle Bergey

by Earle Bergey

by Earle Bergey

by Earle Bergey

by Earle Bergey

by Gabriel Mayorga

by Hans Wessolowski

by Harold V. Brown

by Harold V. Brown

by Harold V. Brown

by Harold V. Brown

by Rudolph Belarski

by Walter Popp

The Covers of Real Detective


The origins of Real Detective are obscure, as is the case with many of the oldest pulp magazines.  It’s believed that it started in 1922 as a magazine called Detective Tales and it was an all-fiction magazine.  However, when the publisher ran into financial trouble two years later, Detective Tales was sold to a new publisher who started to mix true crime with the short fiction.  The name of the magazine was changed to Real Detective Tales and Mystery Stories, which was certainly a mouthful.

Then, 1931, the name of the magazine was changed again, this time to just Real Detective.  The magazine’s format was now exclusively true crime and salacious scandal.  The new format proved popular enough that Real Detective ran until 1985.  Below are a few covers from the early days of Real Detective.  (Around 1954, Real Detective went from hiring illustrators to draw their covers to hiring photographers to take pictures of distressed-looking models.)  Where known, the artist has been credited.

by Alex Redmond

by Alex Redmond

by Alex Redmond

by Charles Wood

by Earle Bergey

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

The Covers of Fight Stories


Can you guess what Fight Stories was about?

Fight Stories made its debut in 1928 and it was the first all-fiction magazine to be devoted to an entire sport.  Every issue was full of boxing stories from some of the most well-regarded of the pulp authors.  Robert E. Howard, who is best-remembered for creating Conan the Barbarian, was one of the writers who was regularly featured in Fight Stories.

Published at the height of boxing’s popularity, Fight Stories was an unqualified success and ended up running, off-and-on, until 1952.  In all, there were a 106 issues of Fight Stories.  Below are just a few of the covers of Fight Stories.  Not surprisingly, they all follow the same basic theme:

Author Unknown

Author Unknown

Author Unknown

by Earle Bergey

by Earle Bergey

by George Gross

by George Gross

by George Gross

by George Gross