High Times Of The Pulp Era


Artist Unknown

Drug abuse is not a new problem in the United States.  The pulp era wrestled with the problem too, with many publications and novels telling the story of young women and young me who fell afoul the pushers and were enticed into a life of sin.

Here’s just a sampling of the high times of the Pulp Era:

by Bill Edwards

by Bill Fleming

by Gerald Gregg

by Howell Dodd

by Rafael DeSoto

by Raymond Johnson

Unknown Artist

by Victor Seach

by Warren King

Artist Unknown

Let’s Go To The Cities With The Pulps!


by Glen Orbik

With the 4th of July approaching, let’s celebrate the American city with the pulps!  Ever since the early days of the pulp industry, writers and artists have excited readers with stories about the lives of those living in America’s cities.  Here, curtsey of some of the best artists to have worked in the industry, is a pulp-guided tour of those cities!

by Al Rossi

by Barye Phillips

by Barye Phillips

by C.C. Beall

by James Avati

by James Meese

by Lou Marchetti

by Mitchell Hooks

by Owen Kampen

by Rafael DeSoto

by Raymond Johnson

by Robert Maguire

by Robert Schulz

by Robert Stanley

by Rudy Nappi

by Rudy Nappi

by Rudy Nappi

by Stanley Meltzoff

by Victor Olson

by Walter Popp

by William George

Let’s Go Country With The Pulps


With the Fourth of July just a few days away, let’s celebrate the American countryside with the pulps!  From the early days of the pulps, life in rural America has been a favorite subject.  Here are a few portrayals of that life, courtesy of some of the best artists and illustrators to work in the pulp industry!

by James Meese

by Barye Phillips

by Emmett Watson

by George Gross

by Hans Helweg

by James Avati

by James Avati

by Julian Paul

by Paul Rader

by Rafael DeSoto

by Raymond Johnson

by Robert Bonfils

by Robert Bonfils

by Robert Maguire

by Robert McGinnis

by Rudy Nappi

by Sam Cherry

by Samson Pollen

by Saul Levine

by Stanley Zuckerberg

by Victor Kalin

by Walter Popp

Artwork of the Day: Run Tough Run Hard (by Raymond Johnson)


by Raymond Johnson

Yesterday, I said we’d probably see more artwork from Raymond Johnson and, right on schedule, today’s artwork is from Raymond Johnson!

This book was originally published in 1964. That’s a nice motorcycle, I wonder if whoever wins the fight gets to keep it. I also like her shoes. I don’t like the motorcycle helmet that’s being worn by the man who has back to us. It looks like it might be too big for his head. Hopefully, it will provide some padding when he gets punched because the other man looks like he knows what he’s doing.

Artwork of the Day: The Go Girls (by Raymond Johnson)


by Raymond Johnson

This is from 1963. Have you been to Kicksville? It sounds like a fun place where you can laugh, dance, undress, and serve coffee. Who knows where Kicksville is even located.

This cover was done by Raymond Johnson, who has been featured on this site in the past and who will undoubtedly be featured many more time in the future.

Artwork of the Day: Hot Date (by Raymond Johnson)


by Raymond Johnson

I’m always a little confused by these covers that feature a new title for a previously published book but which also include the old title.  If they liked Shame Girl so much, why did they change the title to Hot Date?  If they didn’t like Shame Girl, why are they still letting everyone know that was the original title?  Hot Date does sound and look better than Shame Girl.  There’s not much shame to be found on this cover.

This cover is from 1949.  It was done by Raymond Johnson, who has been featured many times on this site and who will be undoubtedly be featured more in the future.

Artwork of the Day: Like Ice She Was (by Raymond Johnson)


by Raymond Johnson

Like Ice She Was was first published in 1960.  Unfortunately, writer William Ard died of cancer shortly after writing this book.  He was only 37 years old.  This was one of the many books that Ard wrote about hard-boiled private detective Lou Largo.  After he died, a few more Largo books were ghost-written by authors like Lawrence Block and John Jakes.  You can read more about William Ard at this tribute site.  And you can read a review (albeit a negative one) of this novel at this site.

As for the cover, the combination of the gun, the cigarette, the red bikini, and the high-wasted pants that compliment the confused expression on her fella’s face make this a pulp classic.  This cover was done by Raymond Johnson, whose work has been featured many times on this site.

Artwork of the Day: I Fear You Not! (by Raymond Johnson)


by Raymond Johnson

This book was first published in 1956.  According to Amazon, it’s a “racy, realistic look at gangsters who terrorized the entire town.”  Did they terrorize why them while on the phone in the tub?  I guess if he could “buy cops the way he bought women,” he might as well.

This cover was done by Raymond Johnson, whose work has been featured many times on this site.  Obviously, the thing that catches your attention about this cover is the way the giant exclamation mark is also used to give the reader a peek inside the story.  No one in either the period or the mark above appear to be feeling any fear.