Lisa Marie’s Week In Review: 10/29/18 — 11/04/18


Me, after Halloween

Oh my God, what a week!

It’s been exhausting but it’s been rewarding!  On Tuesday, Jeff and I saw Big Data perform at the House of Blues!  Then on Wednesday, Halloween!  And now …. now, I’m trying to rest.  I’m probably not going to be as prolific a film blogger over the upcoming week as I was in October.  Horrorthon took a lot of effort but it was totally worth it!

Plus, this upcoming week is my birthday week!  On November 9th, I will be another year older and …. yeah, let’s not talk too much about that.

Here’s what I accomplished this week:

Movies I Watched:

  1. 14 Cameras (2018)
  2. Billionaire Boys Club (2018)
  3. Dead on the Water (2018)
  4. Detour (1945)
  5. Halloween (1978)
  6. Halloween 2 (1981)
  7. Halloween 3: Season of the Witch (1982)
  8. A House Divided (1913)
  9. Inferno (1980)
  10. Killer Under The Bed (2018)
  11. Lady Gangster (1942)
  12. Lady in the Death House (1944)
  13. Masque of the Red Death (1964)
  14. Night of the Living Dead (1968)
  15. The Other Side of the Wind (2018)
  16. The Perfect Mother (2018)
  17. Psycho Prom Queen (2018)
  18. Six: The Mark Unleashed (2004)
  19. Suspiria (1977)
  20. The Vampire and the Ballerina (1960)
  21. Where Are My Children? (1916)
  22. Whispering Footsteps (1943)
  23. Zombie at 17 (2018)

Television Shows I Watched:

  1. 911
  2. American Horror Story
  3. American Masters: Edgar Allan Poe
  4. Bar Rescue
  5. Better Call Saul
  6. Birth of the Living Dead
  7. The Brady Bunch
  8. Camping
  9. Charmed
  10. Chilling Adventures of Sabrina
  11. Dancing with The Stars
  12. Degrassi
  13. The Deuce
  14. Doctor Phil
  15. Face the Truth
  16. Friends
  17. Hell’s Kitchen
  18. Homecoming
  19. It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia
  20. Jamestown
  21. King of the Hill
  22. Kolchak: The Night Stalker
  23. Legacies
  24. Mike Judge Presents Tales From The Tour Bus
  25. Night Gallery
  26. The Office
  27. Parking Wars
  28. Saved By The Bell
  29. Seinfeld
  30. Shipping Wars
  31. South Park
  32. Survivor 37
  33. The Twilight Zone
  34. The Walking Dead
  35. You
  36. Young Sheldon

Books I Read:

  1. The Craven House Horrors (1982) by Hilary H. Milton
  2. You Are A Cat (2011) by Sherwin Tija
  3. You Are A Cat In The Zombie Apocalypse (2013) by Sherwin Tija
  4. You Are A Kitten (2011) by Sherwin Tija

Music To Which I Listened:

  1. Above & Beyond
  2. Adi Ulmansky
  3. Big Data
  4. Broken Peach
  5. Charli XCX
  6. Elle King
  7. Emerson Drive
  8. Erika Costello
  9. Goblin
  10. Grace Lightman
  11. Jakalope
  12. IC3PEAK
  13. Kedr Livanskiy
  14. King Princess
  15. LANY
  16. Leo Moracchioli
  17. Lindsey Stirling
  18. Mai Lin
  19. Matthew Dear
  20. Michael Fredo
  21. Moby
  22. Mothica
  23. Ninja Sex Party
  24. Public Service Broadcasting
  25. Slashtreet Boys
  26. Tara Lee

Links From Last Week:

  1. On her photography site, Erin shared: 30, Keep Walking, Foggy Morning, Foggy Neighborhood, Foggy Neighborhood 2, Foggy Neighborhood 3, Foggy Neighborhood 4, The Dead, Keep Watch, Watch Tower, Rain, Rain 2, Rain 3, Rain 4, Rain 5, Rain 6, Rain 7, Rain 8, Rain 9, Rain 10, Rain 11, Rain 12, Storm, Storm 2, Storm 3, Storm 4, Storm 5, Storm 6, November, Ducks, Army, and Mockingbird Station!
  2. On my music site, I shared music from Above & Beyond, Big Data, Broken Peach, Emerson Drive, Adi Ulmansky, more from Adi Ulmansky, and IC3PEAK!
  3. On Reality TV Chat Blog, I reviewed the latest episode of Survivor!
  4. Alec Baldwin Was Always Trash
  5. Liberals Scorned Me For Liking Ballet
  6. Ridley Scott to Develop Gladiator 2
  7. Voter Education: Eight candidates who have expressed blatantly anti-Semitic views, or who openly associate with anti-Semites

Links From The Site:

  1. I shared music videos from Mai Lin, Slashstreet Boys, Leo Morachioli, Grace Lightman, Adi Ulmansky, another one from Adi Ulmansky, and yet another one from Adi Ulmansky!  I reviewed Episode 5 and Episode 6 of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina.  I shared The Twonky, Little Shop of Horrors, and Night of the Living Dead.  I paid tribute to Christopher Lee, John Carpenter, George Romero, Boris Karloff, and Bela Lugosi!  I shared scenes that I loved from The Wicker Man, The Fog, Zombi 2, Dawn of the Dead, Halloween III, and Targets!   I shared Episodes 19 and 20 of Kolchak and The Curse of Degrassi!  I also reviewed Nadja, The Vampire and the Ballerina, Vampire Circus, a book about The Night of the Living Dead, Dead in the Water, Killer Under the Bed, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Six: The Mark Unleased, Lady Gangster, Whispering Footsteps, Footsteps in the Night, Lady in the Death House, The Billionaire Boys Club, and Fifty Shades Freed!  I also shared a Peter Cushing interview6 Trailers For 6 Films That Still Scare Me and an AMV of the Day!
  2. Erin shared the following artwork: Blood of Dracula, On the Edge of the Galaxy, All True Love Stories, Virgil Finlay, Ghost, more from Virgil Finlay, Window, Walk on the Water, The Path Between, and Torment!  She also took a look at the Skeletal Covers of the Pulp Era and shared several vintage Halloween postcards!  She reviewed The Jackie Robinson Story, wished you a Happy Halloween, and posted the final post of October!
  3. Ryan reviewed Going to Heaven and From Crust Till Dawn.  He also shared his weekly reading round-up!
  4. Gary reviewed The Creature From the Black Lagoon, The Revenge of the Creature, The Creature Walks Among Us, The Other Side of the Wind, and the Stone Killer! He also shared Bela and Boris doing the Monster Mash!  He also shared a little more Bela and Boris!  Finally, he cleaned some Halloween leftovers out of his DVR and shared a one-hit wonder!
  5. Case reviewed Episodes 7, 8, 9, and 10 of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina!
  6. Jeff reviewed Demon Wind, The Carpenter, and FleshEater, and shared 8 Frightening Serials from Dr. Who’s Classic Era!
  7. Arleigh shared Highway to Hell!

(Want to see what I accomplished last week?  Click here!)

Cleaning Out the DVR #21: Halloween Leftovers 3


cracked rear viewer

Time to reach deep inside that trick-or-treat bag and take a look at what’s stuck deep in the corners. Just when you thought it was safe, here’s five more thrilling tales of terror:

YOU’LL FIND OUT (RKO 1940; D: David Butler) – Kay Kyser and his College of Musical Knowledge, for those of you unfamiliar…

…were a Swing Era band of the 30’s & 40’s who combined music with cornball humor on their popular weekly radio program. RKO signed them to a movie contract and gave them this silly but entertaining “old dark house” comedy, teaming Kay and the band (featuring Ginny Simms, Harry Babbitt, Sully Mason, and the immortal Ish Kabibble!) with horror greats Boris Karloff , Bela Lugosi , and Peter Lorre . It’s got all the prerequisites: secret passageways, a creepy séance, and of course that old stand-by, the dark and stormy night! The plot has Kyser’s…

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Horror Film Review: Buffy the Vampire (dir by Fran Rubel Kuzui)


Watching this movie was such a strange experience.

Now, of course, I say that as someone who grew up watching and loving the television version of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  Back when Buffy was on TV, I was always aware that the character had first been introduced in a movie but every thing I read about Buffy said that the movie wasn’t worth watching.  It was a part of the official Buffy mythology that Joss Whedon was so unhappy with what was done to his original script that he pretty much ignored the film when he created the show.

So, yes, the 1992 movie version of Buffy the Vampire Slayer showed how Buffy first learned that she was a slayer, how she fought a bunch of vampires in Los Angeles, and how her first watcher met his end.  But still, Joss Whedon was always quick to say that the film should not be considered canonical.  Whenever anyone on the TV show mentioned anything from Buffy’s past, they were referencing Joss Whedon’s original script as opposed to the film that was eventually adapted from that script.  (For instance, on the tv series, everyone knew that Buffy’s previous school burned down.  That was from Whedon’s script.  However, 20th Century Fox balked at making a film about a cheerleader who burns down her school so, at the end of the film version, the school is still standing and romance is in the air.)  In short, the film existed but it really didn’t matter.  In fact, to be honest, it almost felt like watching the movie would somehow be a betrayal of everything that made the televisions series special.

Myself, I didn’t bother to watch the film version of Buffy the Vampire Slayer until several years after the television series was canceled and, as I said at the start of the review, it was a strange experience.  The movie is full of hints of what would make the television series so memorable but none of them are really explored.  Yes, Buffy (played here by Kristy Swanson) has to balance being a teenager with being a vampire slayer but, in the film, it turns out to be surprisingly easy to do.  Buffy is just as happy to be a vampire slayer as she is to be a cheerleader.  In fact, one of the strange things about the film is just how quickly and easily Buffy accepts the idea that there are vampires feeding on her classmates and that it’s her duty to destroy them.  Buffy’s watcher is played by Donald Sutherland and the main vampire is played by Rutger Hauer, two veteran actors who could have played these roles in their sleep and who appear to do so for much of the film.  As for Buffy’s love interest, he’s a sensitive rebel named Oliver Pike (Luke Perry).  On the one hand, it’s fun to see the reversal of traditional gender roles, with Oliver frequently helpless and needing to be saved by Buffy.  On the other hand, Perry and Swanson have next to no chemistry so it’s a bit difficult to really get wrapped up in their relationship.

I know I keep coming back to this but watching the movie version of Buffy is a strange experience.  It’s not bad but it’s just not Buffy.  It’s like some sort of weird, mirror universe version of Buffy, where Buffy starts her slaying career as a senior in high school and she never really has to deal with being an outcast or anything like that.  (One gets the feeling that the movie’s Buffy wouldn’t have much to do with the Scooby Gang.  Nor would she have ever have fallen for Angel.)  Kristy Swanson gives a good performance as the film version of Buffy, though the character is not allowed to display any of the nuance or the quick wit that made the television version a role model for us all.  Again it’s not that Buffy the movie is terrible or anything like that.  It’s just not our Buffy!

Horror on TV: The Curse of Degrassi (dir by Stefan Brogren)


Can you believe that Halloween and Horrorthon are both nearly over!?  I’ve got tears in my mismatched eyes.

Originally, I was planning on posting the final episode of Kolchak tonight but I miscounted and, to make a long story short, I ran out of episodes of Kolchak before I ran out of days in October!

So, for our final Horror on TV of the 2018 Horrorthon, I’m going to share an old favorite of mine, The Curse of Degrassi!

Originally airing on October 28th, 2008, The Curse of Degrassi features Degrassi’s main mean girl, Holy J Sinclair (Charlotte Arnold), getting possessed by the vengeful spirit of deceased school shooter, Rick Murray (Ephraim Ellis).  Chaos follows!  Fortunately, Spinner (Shane Kippel) is around to save the day.  As any true Degrassi fan can tell you, only Spinner has a chance against the forces of the undead.

Enjoy!

The TSL’s Daily Horror Grindhouse: Vampire Circus (dir by Robert Young)


One of the greatest Hammer vampire films didn’t even star Christopher Lee.  In fact, it wasn’t even a Dracula film.  Instead, it was the story of a circus.

1971’s Vampire Circus tells the dark story of a Serbian village called Stetl.  Early in the 19th century, the children of Stetl are dying.  The superstitious villagers believe that Count Mitterhaus (Robert Tayman) might be responsible.  In fact, they suspect that Count Metterhaus might be a vampire!  Why?  Well, first off, he only seems to be around during the night.  Secondly, he lives in a big spooky castle.  Third, he’s a count and don’t all counts eventually become vampires?

Now, it would be nice to say that all this turned out to be a case of the villagers letting their imaginations get the better of them but nope.  It turns out that they’re pretty much right.  One night, the local teacher, Albert Muller (Laurence Payne), sees his own wife, Anna (Domini Blythe) leading a child towards the dark castle.  It turns out that Anna has fallen under the spell of Count Mitterhaus.  The villagers promptly drive a stake through the Count’s heart, though he manages to do two things before dying.  First off, he curses the town and announces that the blood of their children will give him new life.  Secondly, he tells Anna to escape and track down his brother.

Fifteen years later and, as one might expect, Stetl is a town under siege.  However, the town is not being attacked by vampires.  (Not yet anyway.)  Instead, the town has been hit by the plague and, as a result, it’s been isolated from the outside world.  Men with guns have surrounded the town and are under orders to kill anyone who tries to leave or enter.  Some in the village believe that this is the result of the Count’s dying curse while others just see it as more evidence of man’s inhumanity to man.  Regardless, it’s not good situation.

Fortunately, escape arrives in the form of the Circus of the Night!  That’s right, a gypsy carnival suddenly appears in town.  How did it manage to slip by the blockade?  Who knows and who cares?  What’s important is that the villagers, especially their children, need an escape from their grim existence and the Circus seems to offer something for everyone.  There are dancers.  There are acrobats.  There’s the mysterious tiger woman.  There’s a mirror that makes you see strange things.  And, of course, the are vampires….

That’s not really a shock, of course.  The name of the film is Vampire Circus, after all.  What always takes me by surprise is just how ruthless and cruel the vampires are in this film.  Even by the standards of a 1970s Hammer film, this is a blood-filled movie but, even beyond that, the vampires almost exclusively seem to target children.  Fortunately, all of Stetl’s children tend to be a bit obnoxious but it’s still a shock to see two fresh-faced boys get lured into a mirror where they are both promptly attacked by a vampire.  (And don’t even get me started on what happens when one of the vampires comes across a boarding school.)  Make no mistake, this circus is not made up of the type of self-tortured, romanticized vampires that have dominated recent films.  These vampire are utterly viscous and without conscience.  In other words, these vampires are actually frightening.

The members of the circus are, themselves, a memorable bunch.  David Prowse is the hulking strongman.  Lalla Ward and Robin Sachs are the achingly pretty, innocent-faced twin acrobats who greedily drink the blood of anyone foolish enough to wander off with them.  Some members of the circus can transform into animals.  What’s interesting is that not all of the members of the circus are vampires.  Some of them, I guess, are just groupies.

Featuring the reddest blood that you’re ever likely to see and a cast of memorably eccentric character actors, Vampire Circus often feels more like an extremely dark fairy tale than a typical Hammer vampire film.  Clocking in at 87 minutes, Vampire Circus is a briskly paced dream of carnivals and monsters.

 

Let’s Talk About Killer Under The Bed (dir by Jeff Hare)


Killer Under The Bed aired on the Lifetime network back on October 20th and, at first glance, it might sound like a typical lifetime film.

Recent widow Sarah (Kristy Swanson) has moved into a new house and gotten a new job.  She has two teenage daughters, both of whom are still struggling to deal with the death of their father.  The older daughter is Chrissy (Madison Lawlor), the star athlete who is protective of her younger sister, even if she’s not always willing to admit it.  Kilee (Brec Bassinger) meanwhile is struggling to escape from her sister’s shadow and fit in at her new school.

Consider some of what Kilee has to deal with.  The school’s resident mean girls are determined to destroy her.  She has a crush on one of her teachers and he seems to be growing more and more obsessed with her.  Kilee has a secret that she can’t tell her mother or her sister and Kilee fears that everyone blames her for what happened to her father.

As I said, it sounds like a typical Lifetime situation but here’s the twist.  Almost all of Kilee’s problem can be linked to the rather ugly doll that she stumbled across in her new home.  Much like buying weed in Colorado and then trying to sell it for a profit in Wyomng, having a voodoo doll seemed like a good idea at first.  By making wishes, Kilee not only punished the school bully but she also resolved a conflict between her mom and a co-worker.  And when Kilee wished that her teacher would love her, he went from holding her at a polite distance to suddenly sending her flirtatious texts and photoshopping their faces onto wedding advertisements!

But, much like a Colorado weed dealer spending the night in a Wyoming jail, Kilee soon discovers that nothing’s ever as easy as it seems.  Even the best of ideas have consequences.  For one thing, the doll has the power to drive people crazy.  Secondly, the doll itself is a bit possessive and has a temper.  When Chrissy comes across the doll and tries to throw it away, the doll responds by climbing out of the trashcan and reentering the house.  Later, when the school bully tries to steal the doll, the doll responds by attacking her with a knife.  Soon, the doll is crawling around the house, hiding underneath beds, and creating all sorts of mayhem.

Oh my God, this was such a great movie!  From the minute that doll unzipped Kilee’s backpak so that it could escape to raise havoc, I knew I was watching a great film.  Killer Under The Bed is totally over the top and just so wonderfully ludicrous that there’s no way that you can’t have fun watching it.  Between the killer doll, the bullies that were so evil that seemed like they should be plotting against The Avengers, and the perpetually confused teacher, Killer Under The Bed was way too much fun.

In the past, I’ve been told that Lifetime tends to be resistant to horror movies.  They really should rethink that policy.  Killer Under The Bed is one of the most entertaining Lifetime films that I’ve seen in a while.