A Movie A Day #127: Brass Target (1978, directed by John Hough)


Everything’s a conspiracy!

At least, that is the claim made by Brass Target, a twisty and unnecessarily complicated thriller that argues that General George S. Patton (played here by George Kennedy, who is even more blustery than usual in the role) did not, as widely believed, die as the result of a car accident but was actually killed by an assassin using rubber bullets.  Why was Patton targeted for assassination?  Was he targeted by Nazis angered by Germany’s defeat or maybe Russians who knew that Patton had argued in favor of invading the Soviet Union towards the end of the war?  Would you believe it was all because Patton was investigating the theft of Nazi gold and his subordinates, the flamboyantly gay Colonel Donald Rogers (Robert Vaughn) and Rogers’s always worried lover, Colonel Walter Gilchrist (Edward Herrmann), were fearful that he was getting too close to discovering the truth?

John Cassevetes, who hopefully used part of his paycheck to fund either The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, Opening Night, or Gloria, plays Joe De Lucca, the burned out OSS colonel who is assigned to track down the Nazi gold but who really just wants to go back home to New York.  Patrick McGoohan, sporting an accent that is supposed to be American, plays De Lucca’s former friend and colleague, Colonel Mike McCauley, who now lives in a German castle.  Max von Sydow is the assassin, who also has a day job as the chairman of a refugee relocation committee.  Sophia Loren plays Mara, a Polish war refugee who, by pure coincidence, has slept with not just De Lucca but almost everyone involved with the conspiracy.  Bruce Davison is the young colonel who acts as Du Lucca’s supervisor.  Even Charles “Lucky” Luciano (played by the very British Lee Montague) is featured as a minor part of the conspiracy.

That is an impressive cast for a less than impressive movie.  Brass Target never provides a convincing reason as to why the conspirators would decide that killing Patton was their only option and, once the conspiracy gets underway and the movie starts to follow around Von Sydow for some Day of the Jackal/Black Sunday-style preparation scenes, the search for the Nazi gold is forgotten.  For some reason, though, I have a soft spot for this frequently ridiculous movie.  There are enough weird moments and details, like Vaughn’s twitchy performance, McGoohan’s accent, the way Kennedy blusters about the Russians being rude to him, and glamorous Sophia Loren’s miscasting, that Brass Target is always watchable even if it is never exactly good.

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Music Video of the Day: Mother, Mother by Tracy Bonham (1996, dir by Jake Scott)


Happy Mother’s Day.

For many of us, today is a bittersweet day.  My sisters and I lost our mom nearly nine years ago and today reminds us of how much we miss her and will always miss her.  At the same time, today is also my niece’s ninth birthday and I know mom would be so proud of how her granddaughter has been raised.

Our music video of the day is also bittersweet.  Tracy Bonham’s Mother, Mother imagines a mother/daughter phone conversation in which the daughter assures her mom that life is great while secretly wishing that she could admit that it’s not.  I don’t think there’s anyone alive who can’t relate to Bonham’s desperation as she shouts, “Everything’s fine!”

There are actually two videos for Mother, Mother, both of which were directed by Jake Scott.  The first one features Tracy Bonham singing on television while her mother (played by Bonham’s real-life mother) cleans up around the house.

The second version is a bit more positive.  To be honest, despite my instinct to naturally embrace the darker version of any work of art, I actually prefer the second video.  Maybe it’s because I like playing dress up and I can relate to screaming while jumping around in a closet.  Who knows?

Anyway … enjoy!