Song of the Day: Never (by Heart)


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To say that the Wilson Sisters (Nancy and Ann) who fronted the band Heart will forever be crushes would be an understatement. These ladies, for a growing teenager whose hormones were on overdrive, were a surprising find during the early years of MTV when they actually showed music videos. The sisters and their band had already made their bones during the 70’s but for most boys and girls of my era it would be the “Big Hair” Era of hard rock during the 1980’s that would introduce Nancy and Ann Wilson to a new generation of fans.

I was already on board the Wilson train (Nancy being my favorite) with their two power ballads from their 1985 self-titled album, “Alone” and “These Dreams”, but these ladies were not just about power ballads. They could rock out with the best of their male counterparts. The fact that both Ann and Nancy were accomplished singers in their own right put them heads and shoulders above most of the hard rock frontmen. Ann Wilson could belt out a tune, hold a note for ages and not lose any power behind those vocals. Nancy would do back-up duties, but no less impressive as a soprano, but it would be her work as lead guitarist that would mesmerize a certain young teenager.

It would be in the track “Never” that the band busts out their hard rock chops. They sure don’t make bands like these anymore. These ladies rocked then and they rock now. Rock on, ladies!

Never

Hey baby I’m talking to you
Stop yourself and listen
Some things you can never never choose
Even if you try, yeah
You’re bangin’ your head again
‘Cause somebody won’t let you in
One chance . . . one love
Your chance to let me know

We can’t go on
Just running away
If we stay any longer
We will surely never get away
Anything you want—we can make it happen
Stand up and turn around
Never let them shoot us down
Never—Never
Never—Never run away

Hey baby you know it’s true
Why you bother lying when you know
That you want it too
Don’t you dare deny me
Walk those legs right over here
Give me what I’m dying for
One chance . . . one love
Hold me down never let me go

We can’t go on
Just running away
If we wait any longer
We will surely never get away
Anything you want—we can make it happen
Stand up and turn around
Never let them shoot us down
Never—Never
Never—Never run away
Never—Never
Never—Never run away

Hey baby I’m talking to you
Stop yourself and listen
Some things you can never choose
Even if you try, yeah
You’re bangin’ your head again
‘Cause somebody won’t let you in
One chance . . . one love
Your chance to let me know

We can’t go on
Just running away
If we stay any longer
We will surely never get away

OO OO Never
OO OO Never

We can’t go on Never
We can’t go on Never

OO OO Never
OO OO Never

We can’t go on Never
We can’t go on Never

 

Song of the Day: 1980’s Edition

  1. Everybody Wants To Rule The World (by Tears for Fears)
  2. Hazy Shade of Winter (by The Bangles)

 

That’s Blaxploitation! 7: TROUBLE MAN (20th Century-Fox 1972)


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One of the earliest Blaxploitaion films is TROUBLE MAN, a 1972 entry about Mr T…

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…no, not THAT Mr. T! THIS Mr. T…

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Thank you! This Mr. T is played by Robert Hooks, a tough talking private eye who drives a big-ass Lincoln Continental and “fixes troubles” on the mean streets of L.A. T gets hired by gangsters Chalky Price and Pete Cockrell to protect their crap games, which are getting ripped off by masked gunmen. Things go awry when Chalky shoots one of the heisters, a dude named Abby who works for rival gangster “Big”. Abby’s body is dumped and word is on the streets T did the killing. Police Capt. Joe Marx puts the heat on T, as does “Big”, so T arranges a late night summit between “Big”, Chalky, and Pete at Jimmy’s Pool Hall .  “Big” arrives, but before Chalky and Pete do, some cops raid the joint. These…

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Oh, “Darling”!


Trash Film Guru

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On the one hand, it’s sort of easy to slag writer/director Mickey Keating’s 2015 indie horror offering Darling as a pretentious, overly-self-conscious, hopelessly derivative knock-off of Roman Polanski’s Repulsion with, sadly, no trace of Catherine Deneuve in sight. In fact, if we get right down to brass tacks here, it’s more than fair to say this film is, at its core, simply an uncredited remake of that earlier — and admittedly superior — work.

On the other hand, though, that’s giving pretty short shrift to what Keating actually has managed to accomplish here, which is to craft a visually stunning, intensely moody, deliriously provocative, and painfully believable tale of a young woman’s descent into madness that, while being far from original, is certainly harrowing and memorable enough in its own right.

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Shot — as its predecessor was — entirely in black and white, Darling follows the downward spiral of its…

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Is “Find Me” Worth Seeking Out?


Trash Film Guru

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One thing I’m kind of digging about Hulu these days is that you can find a decent number of really low-budget, truly “indie” horror flicks on there (the rights to which were probably secured at sub-fire sale prices) that Netflix wouldn’t touch in a million years. Granted, most of these are every bit as amateurish as you’d expect, but that doesn’t always mean that they’re necessarily bad. Case in point : director Andy Palmer’s Colorado-lensed 2014 effort, Find Me.

This is obviously a get-some-friends-together-in-front-of-the-camera affair, given that co-stars Cameron Bender and Kathryn Lyn are credited as co-screenwriters along with Palmer himself, and as ghost stories go it’s nothing beyond the standard, plot-wise : newlyweds Tim (Bender) and Emily (Lyn) are starting a new life in the unnamed small town where Emily grew up. Tim’s landed a gig as a teacher at he local high school and Emily’s still…

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Music Video of the Day: (Keep Feeling) Fascination by The Human League (1983, dir. Steve Barron)


Two years before he directed a-ha’s Take on Me, Steve Barron directed this very simple music video for The Human League. He has a huge filmography when it comes to music videos from the late 1970s through the 1980s. We’ll see him again. He also directed some features such as the original Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles (1990) and Coneheads (1993).

He did this video with it’s single color room, single color clothes, and single color outside that reminds one of conformity. It’s also a place that is located on a map, or a starting place or turning point for your life. I like how the lyrics of the song, and of course the gender non-conformity of Philip Oakey, contrast with the appearance of the room and the band. I don’t know about you, but I look at this video and can see this room transform into the pencil drawn one from Take on Me.

Oakey was known to even dress in matching outfits with female members of the band back then. He isn’t transgender or anything like that. He was just gender non-conforming.

The area you see as being orange was actually painted that way shortly before the house was demolished. The band’s scenes were filmed in a studio, which you can spot as the camera goes through the window. There is a tiny little bit that is easy to miss with the orange. Outside the house there are a couple of kids playing with a soccer ball. When one of the kids retrieves it from the orange outside of the house, his clothes suddenly change color to match.

This is another song that I discovered courtesy of the Grand Theft Auto: Vice City soundtrack.