Lisa Watches An Oscar Winner: Ben-Hur (dir by William Wyler)


Ben-Hur

I’m actually kind of upset with myself because, at one point, I was planning on spending all of February watching TCM’s 31 Days of Oscars and reviewing all of the best picture nominees that showed up on the channel.  Unfortunately, I ended up getting busy with other things (like Shattered Politics, for instance) and it was only tonight that I finally got a chance to sit down and watch TCM.  Oh well, maybe next year! But for now, I’m just going to watch and review as much as I can before the month ends.

With that in mind, I just spent four hours watching the 1959 best picture winner Ben-Hur.

In many ways, Ben-Hur feels like a prototypical best picture winner.  It’s a big epic film that obviously cost a lot to produce and which features a larger-than-life star surrounded by a bunch of a memorable character actors.  It features two spectacular set pieces and some human drama that’s effective without being particularly challenging.  It’s a film that deals with big themes but does so in a rather safe way.  Perhaps not surprisingly, it’s a film that, today, is often dismissed as being old-fashioned and simplistic and yet it’s still a lot of fun to watch.

Opening with no less of an event than the birth of Jesus, Ben-Hur tells the story of Judah Ben-Hur (Charlton Heston), a wealthy Jewish aristocrat who, as a young man, was best friends with a Roman named Messala (Stephen Boyd).  When Messala is named as the new commander of the local Roman garrison, he is upset to discover that Ben-Hur is more loyal to his religion than to the Roman Empire.  Feeling personally rejected by his best friend (and perhaps more, as there are a lot of theories about the subtext of their relationship), Massala frames Ben-Hur for the attempted assassination of Judea’s governor.

Over the next 220 minutes, we watch as Ben-Hur goes from being a prisoner to a galley slave to the adopted son of a Roman general (Jack Hawkins) and finally one of the best chariot racers in ancient Rome.  Throughout it all, he remembers a mysterious man who once attempted to give him a sip of water.  Meanwhile, Ben-Hur’s family has been imprisoned and afflicted with leprosy.  Appropriately, for a film that opened with the Nativity, it ends with the Crucifixion, during which Ben-Hur’s struggle to save his family also comes to a climax.

Ben-Hur is undoubtedly flawed film.  (Among the film that were nominated for best picture of 1959, my favorite remains Anatomy of Murder.)  The film runs about an hour too long, some of the supporting actors give performances that are a bit too over-the-top, and the entire film is so reverential that in can be difficult for modern audiences, especially in this age of nonstop irony, to take it seriously.  In the lead role, Charlton Heston is always watchable and has a strong physical presence but you never quite believe that he’s the thinker that the script insists that he is.  There’s nothing subtle about Heston’s performance but, then again, there’s nothing subtle about the film itself.

And yet, if the film struggles to connect on a human level, Ben-Hur still works as a spectacle.  The gigantic sets and the ornate costumes are still impressive to look at.  The film’s two big action sequences — a shipwreck and the chariot race — are still exciting and thrilling to watch.  Ben-Hur may be dated but you can still watch it and understand why it was so popular with audiences in 1959 and, though I may not agree with a lot of the decisions, I can see why the Academy honored Ben-Hur with a record 11 Oscars.  It’s the type of spectacle that, in 1959, could only have been found on the big screen.  By honoring Ben-Hur, the Academy was honoring the relevance of the Hollywood establishment.

In the end, Ben-Hur may not hold up as well as some best picture winners but it’s still worth watching.

9 responses to “Lisa Watches An Oscar Winner: Ben-Hur (dir by William Wyler)

  1. I think it’s that very reverence that some of the performances took that give films like Ben-Hur that certain unique appeal that made such films memorable. I mean how can we forget Peter Ustinov’s performance as Emperor Nero in Quo Vadis. It was so melodramatic and over-the-top that one couldn’t help but be pulled in by it.

    Like

  2. BEN-HUR, like “Cleopatra” and “The Ten Commandments” are movies I like to recommend to modern audiences as the best examples of a style of movie making that we will never see again. Back then, if they needed the city of Rome, then by Cecil B.DeMille, they went out and built a city. If a scene needed 100,000 extras then they went out and hired 100,000 people and fully costumed them. No CGI. No green screen. When you think about it it’s quite astonishing and gives these movies a visual texture and weight that convinces your eye of the reality you’re watching.

    And yeah, there’s a number of theories about the relationship between Ben-Hur (Charlton Heston) and Messala (Stephen Boyd) The most popular one is that Stephen Boyd was told by either the director or screenwriter that Ben-Hur and Messala had been lovers when they were boys and so Boyd played it that way.

    Like

  3. Pingback: Lisa Watches An Oscar Nominee: The Nun’s Story (dir by Fred Zinnemann) | Through the Shattered Lens

  4. Pingback: Lisa Watches The Oscar Winners: The Apartment (dir by Billy Wilder) | Through the Shattered Lens

  5. Pingback: Embracing the Melodrama Part II #26: Cleopatra (dir by Joseph L. Mankiewicz) | Through the Shattered Lens

  6. Pingback: Lisa Ranks Every Best Picture Winner From Best To Worst! | Through the Shattered Lens

  7. Pingback: Lisa’s Week In Review — 4/6/20 — 4/12/20 | Through the Shattered Lens

  8. Pingback: Film Review: The Greatest Story Ever Told (dir by George Stevens) | Through the Shattered Lens

  9. Pingback: Film Review: King of Kings (dir by Nicholas Ray) | Through the Shattered Lens

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.