4 Shots From 4 Films: Special Jess Franco Edition


4 Shots From 4 Films is just what it says it is, 4 shots from 4 of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 Shots From 4 Films lets the visuals do the talking!

Today is the 90th anniversary of the birth of Jesus Franco!  One of the most prolific filmmakers of all time, Franco made movies that …. well, they’re not easy to describe.  Jess Franco was responsible for some of the most visually striking and narratively incoherent films ever made.  He made films that you either loved or you hated but there was no mistaking his work for being the work of someone else.

Today, in honor of his birthday, here are….

4 Shots From 4 Films

The Awful Dr. Orloff (1962, dir by Jess Franco)

The Blood of Fu Manchu (1968, dir by Jess Franco)

Vampyros Lesbos (1970, dir by Jess Franco)

Countess Perverse (1973, dir by Jess Franco)

4 Shots From 4 Jess Franco Films: Count Dracula, Vampyros Lesbos, She Killed in Ecstasy, Female Vampire


4 Shots From 4 Films is just what it says it is, 4 shots from 4 of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 Shots From 4 Films is all about letting the visuals do the talking.

4 Shots From 4 Films

Count Dracula (1970, directed by Jess Franco)

Count Dracula (1970, directed by Jess Franco)

Vampyros Lesbos (1971, directed by Jess Franco)

Vampyros Lesbos (1971, directed by Jess Franco)

She Killed in Ecstasy (1971, directed by Jess Franco)

She Killed in Ecstasy (1971, directed by Jess Franco)

Female Vampire (1973, dir by Jess Franco)

Female Vampire (1973, dir by Jess Franco)

Ten Trailers From Jess Franco


francohimself1I was saddened to learn of the passing of Jess Franco. Franco directed at least 199 films and, while he was never a favorite of the critics, he was a favorite for those of us who appreciated his unique aesthetic and improvisational style of filmmaking. Franco made a few good films and a lot of a bad films but even his worse films were usually more interesting than the usual films churned out by more “respectable” filmmakers. In a time when every director is claiming to be an independent artist, Franco truly was.

Trailers for Franco’s films often showed up in my Lisa Marie’s Favorite Grindhouse and Exploitation Film Trailers series.  Here’s ten of them.

1) Female Vampire

2) The Awful Dr. Orloff

3) Faceless

4) Venus In Furs

5) Necromonicon (a.k.a. Succubus)

6) Kiss Me Monster

7) Eugenie: Story of Her Journey Into Perversion

8) Vampyros Lesbos

9) The Castle of Fu Manchu

10) 99 Women

 

Jesus Franco Manera, R.I.P.

6 Trailers for Cinco De Mayo


Hola and happy Cinco De Mayo!  I’m not sure if Cinco De Mayo is as big a deal up north as it is down here in the Southwest but today is going to be one of the few Saturdays that I don’t go to the movies.  Instead, I will be observing this day with friends, family (I am a fourth Spanish), and cerveza.  But first, here’s the latest edition of Lisa Marie’s Favorite Grindhouse and Exploitation Trailers…

(Be warned: Some of these trailers are a tad bit more explicit than some of the other trailers that I’ve featured as a part of this series.  Watch with caution.)

1) Tombs of the Blind Dead (1971)

This is one of the first of the great Spanish horror films. 

2) Return of the Evil Dead (1973)

The Blind Dead returned in this gory and violent sequel.  One of my prize possessions is my Blind Dead box set, which was released (in the shape of a coffin, no less) by Blue Underground.

3) Vampyros Lesbos (1971)

This is the German trailer for Vampyros Lesbos, directed by the infamous Jess Franco.  Just try to guess what this film is about…

4) Oasis of the Living Dead (1981)

In a career that has spanned over 500 films, Jess Franco has dealt with not only lesbian vampires but zombies as well…

5) Night of the Bloody Apes (1969)

From Rene Cardona comes this surprisingly bloody films about what happens when an ape’s heart is transplanted into a normal human being.  Fortunately, there’s a wrestler around to save the day…

6) The Werewolf Vs. The Vampire Woman (1970)

Finally, let’s end things with a Paul Naschy film, shall we?