4 Shots From 4 Films: In Tribute To Sidney Poitier


4 Or More Shots From 4 Or More Films is just what it says it is, 4 shots from 4 of our favorite films. As opposed to the reviews and recaps that we usually post, 4 Shots From 4 Films lets the visuals do the talking!

Earlier, today, it was announced that Sidney Poitier had passed away at the age of 94.

Poitier was, of course, the first black actor to win the Oscar for Best Actor.  He won that award for 1962’s Lillies of the Field.  He would go on to star in the Oscar-winning In The Heat of the Night, where he delivered the famous line, “They call me Mr. Tibbs!”  Poitier was one of the first black actors to be acknowledged as a movie star.  In the 70s and the 80s, he chafed at the limited selection of roles that he was being offered in mainstream productions and he started to produce and direct his own films.  He also served as a diplomat, serving as the Bahamian ambassador to both Japan and UNESCO.

In honor of Poitier’s life and legacy, here are….

4 Shots From 4 Sidney Poitier Films

A Raisin in the Sun (1961, dir by Daniel Petrie, DP: Charles Lawton Jr.)

Paris Blues (1961, dir by Martin Ritt, DP: Christian Matras)

In The Heat of the Night (1967, dir by Norman Jewison, DP: Haskell Wexler)

Brother John (1971, dir by James Goldstone, DP: Gerald Perry Finnerman)

3 responses to “4 Shots From 4 Films: In Tribute To Sidney Poitier

  1. Pingback: 4 Shots From 4 Films: In Tribute To Sidney Poitier – THE FLENSBURG FILES

  2. Pingback: Lisa Marie’s Week In Review: 1/3/22 — 1/9/22 | Through the Shattered Lens

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