Last Night In Soho wins in Hawaii


The Hawaii Film Critics Society has announced their picks for the best and worst of 2021.  Last Night in Soho was named the best.  Space Jam 2 was named the worst.

Have I mentioned how much I love Hawaii?

Here are all the winners from the Islands!

BEST PICTURE
Belfast
CODA
Last Night in Soho
Mass
The Power of the Dog

BEST DIRECTOR
Kenneth Branagh – Belfast
Jane Campion – The Power of the Dog
Destin Daniel Cretton – Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
Guillermo Del Toro – Nightmare Alley
Sian Heder – CODA

BEST ACTOR
Nicolas Cage – Pig
Benedict Cumberbatch – The Power of the Dog
Peter Dinklage – Cyrano
Andrew Garfield – Tick, Tick…Boom!
Will Smith – King Richard

BEST ACTRESS
Jessica Chastain – The Eyes of Tammy Faye
Emilia Jones – CODA
Nicole Kidman – Being the Ricardos
Thomasin McKenzie – Last Night in Soho
Kristen Stewart – Spencer

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Jamie Dornan – Belfast
Ciaran Hinds – Belfast
Troy Kotsur – CODA
Jared Leto – House of Gucci
Kodhi Smit- McPhee – The Power of the Dog

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Caitriona Balfe – Belfast
Ariana DeBose – West Side Story
Kirsten Dunst – The Power of the Dog
Aunjanue Ellis – King Richard
Marlee Matlin – CODA

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Belfast 
Don’t Look Up
King Richard
Last Night in Soho
Pig

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
CODA
Dune
Nightmare Alley
The Power of the Dog
The Tragedy of Macbeth

BEST ART DIRECTION
Belfast
Dune 
The Green Knight
Nightmare Alley
The Power of the Dog

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
Dune
House of Gucci 
Last Night in Soho
Nightmare Alley
West Side Story

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Dune 
Belfast
Last Night in Soho
Nightmare Alley
The Power of the Dog

BEST EDITING
Belfast
Dune
Last Night in Soho
The Power of the Dog
West Side Story

BEST ANIMATED FILM
Encanto
Luca
The Mitchells vs. The Machines
Raya and the Last Dragon
Sing 2

BEST DOCUMENTARY
9/11: Inside the President’s War Room
Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Bunny
The First Wave
Summer of Soul 
Val

BEST MAKE-UP
Cruella
Cyrano
Dune
The Eyes of Tammy Faye
House of Gucci

BEST SOUND
Dune
Last Night in Soho
A Quiet Place Part II
Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
Spider-Man: No Way Home

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE
Don’t Look Up
Dune
Encanto
The Harder They Fall
The Power of the Dog

BEST SONG
“Down to Joy” – Belfast
“Beyond the Shore” – CODA
“Just Look Up” – Don’t Look Up
“Be Alive” – King Richard
“No Time to Die” – No Time to Die

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Dune
Free Guy
No Time to Die
Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
Spider-Man: No Way Home

BEST STUNT WORK
Black Widow
Nobody
No Time to Die
​Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings
Spider-Man: No Way Home

BEST NEW FILMMAKER
Maggie Gyllenhaal – The Lost Daughter
Rebecca Hall – Passing
Fran Kranz – Mass
Lin Manuel Miranda – Tick, Tick…Boom!
Michael Sarnoski – Pig

BEST FIRST FILM
Mass
The Novice
Passing
Pig
Tick, Tick…Boom!

BEST OVERLOOKED FILM
The Card Counter
CODA
Last Night in Soho
Malignant
The Night House

BEST VOCAL/MOTION CAPTURE PERFORMANCE: 
Olivia Colman – The Mitchells vs. The Machines
Thomas Hayden Church – Spider-Man: No Way Home
John Leguizamo – Encanto
Kelly Marie Tran – Raya and the Last Dragon
Danny McBride – The Mitchells vs. The Machines

BEST HORROR FILM
Antlers
Candyman
Last Night in Soho
Malignant
A Quiet Place Part II

BEST COMIC BOOK MOVIE
Black Widow
Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings 
Spider-Man: No Way Home
The Suicide Squad
Zack Snyder’s Justice League

BEST SCI-FI FILM
Dune 
Free Guy
The Matrix Resurrections
A Quiet Place Part II
Reminiscence

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Benedetta (France)
Drive My Car (Japan)
The Hand of God (Italy) 
Lamb (Iceland)
The Worst Person in the World (Norway)

BEST HAWAIIAN FILM
Finding Ohana (Oahu)
I Was a Simple Man (dir. Christopher Makoto Yogi) (Oahu)
Ka Ho’i The Return (dir. Mitchel Viernes) (Oahu)
Waterman (dir. Isaac Halisima) (Oahu)
Our Makawao (dir. Robert Stone, Matt Yamashita) (Maui)

WORST FILM OF 2021
Coming 2 America
Don’t Breathe 2
The Matrix Resurrections
Space Jam: A New Legacy 
Venom: Let There Be Carnage

The Georgia Film Critics Association Honors Licorice Pizza!


The Georgia Film Critics Association have announced their picks for the best of 2021!  Licorice Pizza picked up another award for Best Picture while Jane Campion continued to sweep the best director awards.  Nic Cage was named Best Actor for Pig.  Alana Haim and Bradley Cooper took Best Actress and Best Supporting Actor (both for Licorice Pizza) while West Side Story‘s Ariana DeBose was named Best Supporting Actress.  Spider-Man: No Way Home was named the best film to have been shot in Georgia.

Here are the winners from Georgia:

Best Picture
BELFAST
CODA
DUNE
FLEE
THE GREEN KNIGHT
LICORICE PIZZA
THE POWER OF THE DOG
TICK, TICK… BOOM!
WEST SIDE STORY
​THE WORST PERSON IN THE WORLD

Best Director
DUNE – Denis Villeneuve
THE GREEN KNIGHT – David Lowery
LICORICE PIZZA – Paul Thomas Anderson
THE POWER OF THE DOG – Jane Campion
WEST SIDE STORY – Steven Spielberg

Best Actor
Nicolas Cage – PIG
Benedict Cumberbatch – THE POWER OF THE DOG
Peter Dinklage – CYRANO
Andrew Garfield – TICK, TICK… BOOM!
Will Smith – KING RICHARD

Best Actress
Lady Gaga – HOUSE OF GUCCI
Alana Haim – LICORICE PIZZA
Agathe Rousselle – TITANE
Kristen Stewart – SPENCER
Rachel Zegler – WEST SIDE STORY

Best Supporting Actor
Bradley Cooper – LICORICE PIZZA
Colman Domingo – ZOLA
Ciarán Hinds – BELFAST
Jason Isaacs – MASS
Troy Kotsur – CODA
Kodi Smit-McPhee – THE POWER OF THE DOG

Best Supporting Actress
Ariana DeBose – WEST SIDE STORY
Ann Dowd – MASS
Kirsten Dunst – THE POWER OF THE DOG
Kathryn Hunter – THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH
Ruth Negga – PASSING

Best Original Screenplay
BEING THE RICARDOS – Aaron Sorkin
BELFAST – Kenneth Branagh
LICORICE PIZZA – Paul Thomas Anderson
MASS – Fran Kranz
TITANE – Julia Ducournau

Best Adapted Screenplay
CODA – Sian Heder
DRIVE MY CAR – Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Takamasa Oe
THE GREEN KNIGHT – David Lowery
THE POWER OF THE DOG – Jane Campion
WEST SIDE STORY – Tony Kushner

Best Cinematography
DUNE
THE GREEN KNIGHT
THE POWER OF THE DOG
THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH
WEST SIDE STORY

Best Production Design
DUNE
THE FRENCH DISPATCH
THE GREEN KNIGHT
NIGHTMARE ALLEY
THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH

Best Original Score
DUNE – Hans Zimmer
ENCANTO – Germaine Franco
THE HARDER THEY FALL – Jeymes Samuel
THE POWER OF THE DOG – Jonny Greenwood
SPENCER – Jonny Greenwood

Best Original Song
“Dos Orugitas” from ENCANTO
“Guns Go Bang” from THE HARDER THEY FALL
“Just Look Up” from DON’T LOOK UP
“No Time to Die” from NO TIME TO DIE
“So May We Start” from ANNETTE

Best Ensemble
CODA
DUNE
LICORICE PIZZA
MASS
THE POWER OF THE DOG

Best Foreign Language Film
DRIVE MY CAR
FLEE
THE HAND OF GOD
PETITE MAMAN
TITANE
​THE WORST PERSON IN THE WORLD

Best Animated Film
ENCANTO
FLEE
LUCA
THE MITCHELLS VS. THE MACHINES
RAYA AND THE LAST DRAGON

Best Documentary Film
THE FIRST WAVE
FLEE
THE RESCUE
SUMMER OF SOUL (…OR WHEN THE REVOLUTION COULD NOT BE TELEVISED)
VAL

Breakthrough Award
Alana Haim – LICORICE PIZZA
Jude Hill – BELFAST
Cooper Hoffman – LICORICE PIZZA
Emilia Jones – CODA
Agathe Rousselle – TITANE
Rachel Zegler – WEST SIDE STORY

Oglethorpe Award for Excellence in Georgia Cinema
ANGIE (short)
BLACK WIDOW
CLEAN SLATE
CONGRATULATIONS (short)
COPSHOP
A FIRE WITHIN
RED NOTICE
RESPECT
SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME
THE SUICIDE SQUAD

Miniseries Review: Ford: The Man and The Machine (dir by Allan Eastman)


Henry Ford changed the world, for both the better and the worst.

Starting from his own small workshop in Dearborn, Michigan, Henry Ford designed the first mass-produced automobile.  He transformed cars from being a luxury item to being something that nearly every family owned.  He created the concept of the assembly line.  He argued that workers needed to be paid a livable wage and he also advocated for an 8-hour workday.  At a time when every facet of American life was heavily segregated, he encouraged his factories an auto dealerships to hire black employees.  He was a pacifist, who took part in a widely-ridiculed but apparently sincere effort to try to convince the leaders of the world to just stop fighting.

Unfortunately, Henry Ford was also something of an unhinged lunatic, a man whose skill at engineering and his empathy for his underpaid workers did not necessarily translate into a sophisticated understanding of anything else.  When the workers in his factories tried to unionize, Ford employed violent strike breakers and he felt that most of the population were like a children and therefore incapable of governing themselves.  He understood how to make car but he also fell for all sorts of quack science and was a believer in reincarnation.

Worst of all, he was a rabid anti-Semite, who blamed almost all of the world’s problems on “Jewish bankers” and who played a huge role in popularizing a scurrilous work called The Protocols of Elder Zion in America.  Claiming to lay out the details of a Jewish plot to secretly control the world, The Protocols were a ludicrous document but many people believed them because they were promoted by Henry Ford, who was as big a celebrity in the early 20th Century as all of the social media influencers are today.  All these years later, The Protocols are still cited by anti-Semites.  A series of anti-Semitic editorials (which Ford later claimed to have signed off on but not actually written) were published in Germany under the title The International Jew, the World’s Foremost Problem.  Hitler wrote of his admiration for Ford in Mein Kampf.  Ford, it should be noted, did keep his distance from Hitler, though whether that was due to a personal distaste or the threat of an economic boycott is not known.  (Jewish leaders had already organized one successful boycott of Ford in the 20s, which led to Ford closing down his newspaper and offering up an apology.)  At the Nuremberg Trials, many of the Nazis said that they had first been introduced to anti-Semitism through the writings of Henry Ford.  Reportedly, when Ford saw newsreel footage of the concentration camps, he was so overcome with emotion that he collapsed from a stroke.

(Two years ago, when Nick Cannon regurgitated the usual anti-Semitic conspiracy theories on a podcast, he was pretty much saying the exact same thing that Henry Ford said at the start of the 20th Century.  Later, under threat of economic boycott, both Ford and Cannon would off up half-hearted apologies for their statements.  Ford continued to make cars.  Cannon continues to host a handful of television shows.  How does that work?)

First broadcast over two nights in 1987, Ford: The Man and the Machine was a Canadian miniseries about the long and controversial life of Henry Ford.  Cliff Robertson played Henry Ford.  Hope Lange played his wife while Heather Thomas played his mistress.  R.H. Thomson played Ford’s son, the sensitive Edsel.  Michael Ironside played Harry Bennett, a sinister figure who was hired to break up union activity and who eventually became Ford’s right-hand man.  If I remember correctly, I believe Canadian law actually required that Michael Ironside appear in almost every Canadian film and television show made in the 80s and the 90s.  His glowering presence and menacing line delivery practically shouted out, “Don’t mess with Canada,” and he does bring a note of genuine danger to his performance here.

Ford: The Man and the Machine opens in the late 20s, with an aging Henry Ford already starting to lose control of his mental faculties.  A series of flashbacks then show how Ford built his first engine, his first car, and eventually his first factory.  We watch as Ford goes from being an enthusiastic, self-taught engineer to being one of the most powerful men in the world.  Along the way, Ford grows arrogant.  The same stubbornness that led to his early success also leads to his later problems.  For all of his ability, Ford’s ego and his refusal to reconsider his conclusions leaves him vulnerable to both flattery and manipulation, whether it’s coming from the White House of Woodrow Wilson, from his own executives, or from the authoritarians who rose to power in Europe following the first World War.  As portrayed in the movie, he’s a loving father who also flies into a rage when Edsel designs a car on his own.  He loves his wife but he keeps a mistress.  He loves his family but he’ll always prefer to spend time working on his cars than spending time with them.  Henry Ford changes the world but his own hubris makes it impossible for him to change with it.

The miniseries is built around Cliff Robertson’s performance as Ford and Robertson does an excellent job in the role, convincingly playing Ford as he goes from being an enthusiastic dreamer to a paranoid millionaire to a doddering old man, a Bidenesque figuredhead who is only nominally in charge of his own company.  Neither the film nor Robertson shy away from showing us Henry Ford’s flaws.  Instead, both the production and the actor offer up a portrait of a complex man who transformed the way that people lived but who couldn’t escape from his own prejudices and resentments.  Ford: The Man and The Machine is a history lesson but it’s a valuable one.  If you’re a student of history, you’ll find much to think about in this miniseires.

For the record, I do drive a Ford and it’s a good car.  However, I tell myself that it’s named after Gerald Ford.

The Doolins of Oklahoma (1949, directed by Gordon Douglas)


Randolph Scott stars in The Doolins of Oklahoma, a fictionalized account of the career of the real-life western outlaw, Bill Doolin.

Doolin (played, naturally, by Randolph Scott) may have once rode with the fearsome Dalton Brothers but, according to this film, he was actually just an ordinary, salt of the Earth type who wanted to settle down with the right woman and lead a normal life. It looks like he might get that opportunity after the Daltons are killed and Doolin tires of leading his own gang of outlaws. Doolin settles in a Oklahoma town, takes a new name, and falls in love with Elaine (Virginia Hutton). But when both the members of his old gang and a veteran lawman (George Macready) show up in town, Doolin learns that the past cannot be escaped.

The plot of The Doolins of Oklahoma is nothing special, though it’s portrayal of the outlaws being more honorable than law enforcement may have been surprising in 1949. The main thing that distinguishes The Doolins of Oklahoma is the cast, which is full of western veterans like John Ireland, Noah Beery Jr., Charles Kemper, Frank Fenton, and Jock Mahoney. Not surprisingly Randolph Scott is ideally cast as a weary cowboy who just wants to settle down and live the rest of his life in peace. Scott is well-matched by MacReady, as the marshal who will not let anything stand in the way doing his duty as a member of law enforcement. Gordon Douglas directs crisply and energetically and every member of the main cast gets at least one big moment in which to distinguish themselves. The Doolins of Oklahoma may not be a groundbreaking film but it will be enjoyed by fans of the western genre.

 

The Films of 2021: Dear Evan Hansen (dir by Stephen Chbosky)


Last night, I finally watched Dear Evan Hansen.

Dear Evan Hansen is the film adaptation of the Tony-award winning Broadway musical of the same name.  Recreating his stage role, Ben Platt plays Evan Hansen, a teenager who suffers from social anxiety and who is mistaken for having been the best friend of Connor Murphy (Colton Ryan), a troubled classmate who committed suicide after stealing a letter that Evan had written to himself.  (Somewhat awkwardly, it was also a letter in which Evan somewhat obliquely wrote about the crush that he had on a member of Connor’s family.)  When the letter is subsequently found on Connor’s body, it’s assumed that it’s a suicide note that Connor meant for Evan.  Evan, who is in love with Connor’s sister, Zoe (Kaitlyn Dever), allows everyone to believe that he and Connor were friends.  Connor’s mother, Cynthia, (Amy Adams) and his stepfather (Danny Pino) adopt Evan as a sort of replacement for their dead son.  Cynthia views Evan as being the only way that she’ll ever understand what Connor was going through and Evan continually reassures that Murphys that Connor really did love all of them and that he was trying to change his life for the better.  With the Murphys now treating Evan as a member of their own family, Evan’s mother (Julianne Moore) feels that her son is now ashamed of her.  And Evan’s classmate, Alana (Amandla Stenberg), launches a movement to raise money to preserve the apple orchard where Evan claims that he and Connor spent all of their time together.

As a musical, Dear Evan Hansen was very popular.  As a film, it doesn’t work and it doesn’t work for all the reasons that everyone assumed that it wouldn’t work.  Believe me, I wanted it work.  From the minute that the trailer first dropped, the reaction to the film has been so overwhelmingly negative that I was really hoping that the film itself would turn out to be an overlooked gem.  I was really hoping that this would be one of those underappreciated films that just needed a few brave champions.  Instead, it turned out to be not terrible in the way that Cats was terrible but still too flawed to be considered a success.

First off, the plot itself doesn’t transition well from the stage to film.  There’s too many holes and there’s too many places in the story where you find yourself wondering why you should care about Evan and his problems.  Those plot holes may not have been as big of a problem when the story was presented on the stage because watching any story play out against an artificial backdrop requires a certain suspension of disbelief.  But, on film, seeing Evan attending an actual school and walking down an actual street and visiting an actual house, you’re much more aware of how inauthentic the story feels.  Evan’s actions rarely make sense and it’s difficult to accept that anyone, even Connor’s emotionally desperate parents, would believe the stories that Evan concocts about his friendship with Connor.  On stage, you could perhaps accept that Zoe would buy that Evan and Connor were friends who confided in each other despite the fact that Evan doesn’t seem to know anything about Connor’s family or home life.  On screen, especially when one considers the fierce intelligence that Kaitlyn Dever brings to the role of Zoe, it’s a bit more difficult to believe.

The other big problem with the film is Ben Platt is too old for the role of Evan.  Platt first played the role in 2015, when he was 23.  He won a Tony and certainly, he deserves a lot of credit for creating the role from the workshop phase all the way to Broadway.  Now, however, he’s 28 and he looks considerably older.  So much of what Evan does is acceptable only if you believe that he’s an immature 17 year-old who is desperately looking for a place and a family where he belongs.  The same actions go from being poignant to being creepy when they’re done by someone who appears to be in his mid-30s.  While Platt has a great singing voice and shines in the musical numbers, he’s a bit too mannered when he just has to recite dialogue.  He’s still giving a stage performance, even though he’s now playing the role on film and everyone around him is giving a film performance.  Platt’s talent is undeniable but he’s miscast here and casting him opposite performers who can actually still pass for teenagers doesn’t help the situation at all.

(When I watched the film, I thought that obvious age difference between Ben Platt and Kaitlyn Dever occasionally made the scenes between Evan and Zoe uncomfortable to watch.  Then I did some research and discovered that Dever is only three years younger than Platt.  It’s just that Dever still looks like a teen while Platt looks very much like an adult.  And there’s no shame in looking your age.  Someone just needs to cast Platt in an adult role.)

In Platt’s defense, the film doesn’t really make perfect use of any of the members of its talented cast.  Amy Adams is such a good actress but the film casts her as a stereotypically flakey rich suburbanite who flitters from one trend to another.  Julianne Moore and Amandla Stenberg are similarly wasted, playing characters who have potential but who are never quite given as much to do as they deserve.  Of the cast, Kaitlyn Dever is the stand-out, even though Zoe is a bit of an inconsistent character.  Initially, she seems like the one person willing to call out everyone on their BS and then, just as suddenly, she’s oddly forgiving of someone who essentially manipulated her emotions for his own benefit.

Not surprisingly, Dear Evan Hansen works best when people are singing.  Ben Platt and Colton Ryan bring so much energy to Sincerely, Me that I briefly had hope that the film was turning itself around.  Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case but still, it’s a good production number.  Unfortunately, the rest of the movie doesn’t really live up to it.

A Blast From The Past: The Other Fellow’s Feelings (dir by Arthur H. Wolf)


Why is Judy crying in class?

She says it’s because Jack “won’t stop teasing me.”  Is Jack to blame or does Judy need to toughen up?  Should Jack’s classmates have said, “Lay off?”  Should Judy’s friends have tattled to the teacher?  Should Judy have teased Jack back?  What would you do?

This short film from 1951 considers all of those issues and yet, it’s hard not to feel that the ultimate message is that Judy needs to stop taking everything so personally.  Sorry, movie.  Sorry, judgmental narrator.  I disagree.  Myself, I think the skinny kid with the glasses should have followed through with his threat to beat Jack up.  Up until I was 12, I had a really severe stutter so I know what Judy was going through.  Fortunately, in my case, I also had three older sisters and a bunch of overprotective cousins that were always looking after me.  Judy doesn’t seem to have that type of support system.  To be honest, in most cases like this, I put the blame on the teachers.  Jack and Judy are sitting up at the front of the class so there’s really no excuse for no one noticing what was going on.

This short film is another one that feels like a Herk Harvey production but it was actually directed by Arthur Wolf.  My favorite shot is the entire class staring at the camera while the narrator asks, “What would you do?”  Seriously, someone’s in a lot of trouble once these kids come to a consensus on who is to blame.

From 1951, it’s time to consider …. The Other’s Fellow’s Feelings.

Scene That I Love: Faye Dunaway in Bonnie and Clyde


Today, the Shattered Lens wishes a happy 81st birthday to the one and only Faye Dunaway.  In honor of this day, I want to share a scene that I love from 1967’s Bonnie and Clyde.

Now, Bonnie and Clyde was not Dunaway’s first film.  After appearing on Broadway, she was cast as a hippie kidnapped in a forgettable crime comedy called The Happening.  Otto Preminger, who could always spot talent even if he didn’t always seem to understand how to persuade that talent to work with him, put her under contract and featured her as the wife of John Phillip Law in his legendary flop, Hurry Sundown.  (Dunaway later said she had wanted to play the role of Michael Caine’s wife, a part that went to Jane Fonda and she never quite forgave Preminger for giving her a less interesting role.)  Dunaway reportedly did not get along with Preminger and didn’t care much for the films that he was planning on featuring her in.  One can imagine that she was happy when Warner Bros. bought her contract so that she could star opposite Warren Beatty in Bonnie and Clyde.  

Despite the fact that the real-life Bonnie Parker was notably shorter and certainly nowhere as glamorous as as the actress who was selected to play, Faye Dunaway proved to be the perfect choice for the role.  Bonnie and Clyde proved to be a surprise hit and an Oscar contender.  It made Dunaway a star, a fashion icon, and it resulted in her first Oscar nomination.  Dunaway would go on to appear in such classic 70s films as Chinatown, The Towering Inferno, Three Days of the Concord, and Network before her unfortunate decision to star as Joan Crawford in Mommie Dearest would slow the momentum of her career.  Unfortunately, she would later become better known for having a difficult reputation and for engaging in some very public feuds, with the press often acting as if Dunaway was somehow uniquely eccentric in this regard.  (To Hollywood, Dunaway’s sin wasn’t that she fought as much as it was that she fought in public.)  Though Dunaway’s career has had its ups and downs, one cannot deny that when she was good, she was very, very good.  

In this scene, from Bonnie and Clyde, Bonnie Parker (played by Faye Dunaway) writes a poem and tries to craft the future image of Bonnie and Clyde.  Though it has none of the violence that made Bonnie and Clyde such a controversial film in 1967, this is still an important scene.  (Actually, it’s more than one scene.)  Indeed, this scene is a turning point for the entire film, the moment that Bonnie and Clyde goes from being an occasionally comedic attack on the establishment to a fatalistic crime noir.  This is where Bonnie shows that, unlike Clyde, she knows that death is inescapable but she also knows that she and Clyde are destined to be legends.

(Of course, Dunaway and Beatty — two performers who one epitomized an era but only work occasionally nowadays — are already legends.)

Music Video of the Day: I Want Your Love by Chic (1979, directed by ????)


I can relate to the title of this song, as I think almost everyone can.  The love of the title doesn’t just have to refer to romantic love.  It can also just mean being loved as in being appreciated or admired or praised or …. well, really whatever you mean for it to mean.  There’s all sorts of love out there.  Everyone wants to be loved and sometimes, that mean exhausting yourself trying to see every movie released in one year in just two weeks.  Not that I’m speaking from personal experience, of course…. heh heh…. 

Watching this video, I found myself a bit upset with myself for having never learned how to play the violin.  It’s a neat little instrument and there’s no way you can’t look transcendent while playing it.  Oh well.  We’ll chalk that up as missed opportunity, I guess.  To be honest, I have a feeling I’d end up putting out someone’s eye with that big bow that they use so I guess it’s for the best that I never learned.

Good song, though.  You can dance to it.  You can laugh to it.  You can cry to it.  This song came out in 1979 and, as we all know, the 70s were the best!

Enjoy!

I want your love
I want your love
I want your love
I want your love


Do you feel like you ever want
To try my love and see how well it fits?
Baby, can’t you see when you look at me
I can’t kick this feelin’ when it hits


All alone in my bed at night
I grab my pillow and squeeze it tight
I think of you and I dream of you all of the time
What am I gonna do?


I want your love
I want your love
I want your love
I want your love


I want your love
I want your love
I want your love
I want your love


Sometime, don’t you feel like you
Never really had a love that’s real?
Well, here I am and who’s to say
A better love you won’t find today


Just one chance and I will show you love
Like no other, two steps above
On your ladder I’ll be a peg
I want your lovin’, please don’t make me beg


I want your love
I want your love
I want your love
I want your love


I want your love
I want your love
I want your love
I want your love


I want your love
I need your love
I’ll share my dreams and make you see
I’m really there, your love I need


I want your love
I need your love
Just like the birds need sky above
I’ll share my dreams and make you see
I’m really there, your love I need


I want your love
I want your love
I want your love
I want your love


I want your love
I want your love
I want your love
I want your love