Why Art?, Indeed : Conor Stechschulte’s “Tintering”


Ryan C.'s Four Color Apocalypse

Note : This is the original, unedited version of a piece I wrote For Daniel Elkin’s Your Chicken Enemy website. As always, I share this here in case interested parties, should such a thing exist, wish to compare the “rough draft” with the finished piece. Mr. Elkin always provides valuable input and suggestions that I think improve things considerably, and if you do read them both back to back, or side by side, or whatever, I’m confident that you’ll agree.

The final, published version is available for your perusal at http://www.danielelkin.com/2018/08/why-art-indeed-ryan-carey-reviews.html

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“Art is always about ‘something hidden.’ But does it help us connect with that hidden something? I think it moves us away from it.”

So begins anarchist theorist John Zerzan’s widely-discussed (in some circles, at any rate) essay “The Case Against Art.” Zerzan, being one of the leading scholars and spokespeople of the “anarcho-primitivist,” or “Green Anarchist” movements…

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Song of the Day: Simple Man (by Lynyrd Skynyrd)


Lynyrd Skynyrd

This past week saw another great musician pass away.

Ed King was an integral part of the three-guitar sound that made the Lynyrd Skynyrd sound so unique among the other blues-inspired American rock bands of the 70’s. Some have called Ed King the backbone of the band.

He was great either on bass guitar or as the third guitarist. The latter becoming the signature sound of the band’s most popular song and one of their most requested: “Free Bird.”

While it’d be simple enough to commemorate Ed King’s passing with another listen to that hit song, it’s on another much simpler song of the band’s that best typifies the member of Lynyrd Skynyrd. He who helped give them their signature sound and whose laid-back attitude finally convinced him that it was time to leave the band when the atmosphere around it began to turn mean and violent.

Some fans of Lynyrd Skynyrd don’t have good things to say about Ed King. They think he bailed on the group just when they were reaching the pinnacle of their success and popularity. But as the song “Simple Man” says, “Oh, take your time, don’t live too fast.”

That was Ed King. It’s time you joined the rest of your band mates waiting for you up above.

Simple Man

Mama told me when I was young
“Come sit beside me, my only son
And listen closely to what I say
And if you do this it’ll help you some sunny day”

“Oh, take your time, don’t live too fast
Troubles will come and they will pass
You’ll find a woman and you’ll find love
And don’t forget, son, there is someone up above”

“And be a simple kind of man
Oh, be something you love and understand
Baby be a simple kind of man
Oh, won’t you do this for me, son, if you can”

“Forget your lust for the rich man’s gold
All that you need is in your soul
And you can do this, oh baby, if you try
All that I want for you, my son, is to be satisfied”

“And be a simple kind of man
Oh, be something you love and understand
Baby be a simple kind of man
Oh, won’t you do this for me, son, if you can”

Oh yes, I will

“Boy, don’t you worry, you’ll find yourself
Follow your heart and nothing else
And you can do this, oh baby, if you try
All that I want for you, my son, is to be satisfied”

“And be a simple kind of man
Oh, be something you love and understand
Baby be a simple kind of man
Oh, won’t you do this for me, son, if you can”

Baby, be a simple, be a simple man
Oh, be something you love and understand
Baby, be a simple kind of man

Music Video of the Day: Tarzan & Jane by Toy-Box (1998, directed by ????)


Lisa tells me that today is Tarzan Day so, in honor of the Lord of the Jungle, today’s music video of the day is Toy-Box’s Tarzan and Jane.

106 years ago, Tarzan made his debut in an issue of The All-Story.  Created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan was actually John Clayton, Viscount Greystoke.  Born to British nobility, Tarzan was raised in the jungle by a tribe of apes.  Tarzan’s great love was an American named Jane Porter.  After marrying Jane, Tarzan would divide his time between England and Africa, always returning to the jungle whenever the hypocrisy of civilization became too much for him to deal with.

The character of Tarzan would go on to star in numerous films and television shows.  He’s been played by everyone from Johnny Weissmuller to Buster Crabbe to Ron Ely.  In the music video for Toy-Box’s Tarzan and Jane, he’s played by Amir El-Falaki.  El-Falaki was one half of Toy-Box.  The other half, Anila Mirza, plays Jane.

Toy-Box was a Danish pop group.  They never achieved much fame in the United States but they were briefly big in Scandinavia.  Tarzan and Jane was their biggest hit, especially after it was re-released in 1999 to coincide with the release of Disney’s animated TarzanTarzan was not anything special but it will always be remembered for unleashing the Phil Collins ballad, You’ll Be In My Heart, on an unsuspecting world.

Four years after the release of Tarzan and Jane, Toy-Box broke up but they have recently reunited and performed for a series of 90s concerts.