OUTLAW GANG ATTEMPTS OSCAR ROBBERY!!


cracked rear viewer

Extry! Extry! Here, hot off the presses, is a photo of the desperate outlaws trying to escape…

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Seriously, never in all my Oscar-watching days have I seen them give the Best Picture award to the wrong picture!! Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway looked befuddled, when a Price Waterhouse official came and straightened out the snafu. Seems Warren was handed the “wrong” envelope when he announced LA LA LAND as the winner instead of MOONLIGHT! The Academy has vowed to look into the whole sordid affair, and will call in Inspector Clouseau to investigate!

Congrats to both films. More Oscar musings:

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*LA LA LAND may have not won Best Picture, but did bring home six statuettes, including Best Actress Emma Stone, and Best Director Damien Chazelle. I really need to see this film!

*It was a good night for our local New England artists. Besides Providence, R.I.’s Chazelle, local boy Casey Affleck (from…

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A Movie A Day #58: Seven Hours to Judgment (1988, directed by Beau Bridges)


7hrs_to_judgement-frntWhen I saw that Erin has picked Judge Not My Sins for her artwork of the day, I was reminded of Seven Hours to Judgment, a movie that used to occasionally show up on HBO.

David Reardon (Ron Liebman) owns an electronics store and is professionally known as “Crazy Dave.”  When three gang members, led by Chino (Reggie Johnson), are arrested for pushing Dave’s wife off of a subway platform, it looks like the legal system might let them go.  Because Dave’s wife is in a coma, she cannot testify that they pushed her.  However, Dave has tracked down a witness who saw what Chino did.  But the witness is not immediately available to testify.  Dave begs Judge John Eden (Beau Bridges) for an extension but the judge is one of those bleeding heart, by-the-book types.  Even though he believes Chino to be guilty, Judge Eden dismisses the case.  At the same time, Dave’s wife dies and Crazy Dave starts to live up to his nickname.

With the help of one of his employees, the hulking and child-like Ira (Tiny Ron), Dave kidnaps both Judge Eden and his wife (Julianne Phillips).  Dave tells Judge Eden that he has seven hours to track down the witness and get the evidence that would have convicted Chino.  If Eden doesn’t find the evidence, his wife will be blown up.  Judge Eden is dumped in the worst part of town, without any money, identification, or credit cards.  Dave tells him, “You helped create these streets!”

The rest of the movie is Eden running through the mean streets of wherever the movie is supposed to be taking place.  (It was filmed in Seattle but the city is never specifically named.)  Everyone who meets Eden tries to beat him up, which is one way to put a judge who is soft on crime in his place.  The only person who doesn’t beat up Eden is a homeless woman who licks his face.  Soon, Eden even has Chino after him.  The normally laid back and affable Beau Bridges isn’t usually thought of as being an action star and this movie shows why.  Judge Eden is such a wuss of a hero that it seems appropriate that he eventually has to hitch a ride in the back of a garbage truck.

Along with the miscasting of Beau Bridges, the other major problem with Seven Hours to Judgment is that it requires us to believe that Dave, even if he is “crazy,” could come up with such an intricate and elaborate plan and set it all up within just a few hours of his wife dying and Chino being released.  “Smug liberal get mugged by reality” was a successful theme for many low-budget action films in the 1980s but Seven Hours to Judgment is ultimately just as dumb and implausible as it sounds.

Seven Hours to Judgment was a reunion for Leibman and Bridges, who previously co-starred in an excellent and overlooked road movie called Your Three Minutes Are Up.  For some reason, Beau Bridges also directed Seven Hours to Judgment.

Music Video of the Day: Movies by Alien Ant Farm (2001, dir. Marcos Siega)


That sure is another version of Movies. It probably looks familiar even if you’ve never seen it before. That’s because a lot of videos by bands like Alien Ant Farm had essentially the same music video at the time.

Used For Glue by Rival Schools

Used For Glue by Rival Schools

Waffle by Sevendust

Waffle by Sevendust

Moment of Weakness by Bif Naked

Moment of Weakness by Bif Naked

Promise by Eve 6

Promise by Eve 6

Last Resort by Papa Roach

Last Resort by Papa Roach

Crawling In The Dark by Hoobastank

Crawling In The Dark by Hoobastank

Chop Suey! by System Of A Down

Chop Suey! by System Of A Down

Satellite by P.O.D.

Satellite by P.O.D.

Fat Lip by Sum 41

Fat Lip by Sum 41

If you’re thinking all those music video were directed by Marcos Siega, then you’d actually be wrong. Fat Lip was directed by Marc Klasfeld who directed the jumping-into-the-theater-screen version of Movies. All the rest of those were directed by Marcos Siega.

I’m of course not bad-mouthing Marcos Siega. Siega also did other tropes of these kinds of videos such as fetishizing the bass player, close-ups of each of the members of the band, cutaways to what people would say are lost youth, and showing the music these bands were raised on. He also did some different stuff like Murder by The Crystal Method and Thorn In My Side by Quicksand. But it’s telling that I could lump Fat Lip in there, and it’s easy to believe that it was done by Siega. I could have also thrown My Friends Over You by New Found Glory in, and it would have fit in as well despite having been directed by the Malloys. Even Kevin Kerslake of Nirvana and Sonic Youth fame would get in on this with the video for Come Original by 311. Point is, I get why they shot another video that while still using a lot of the familiar tropes, such as the big audience, is much more interesting and memorable.

Something tells me that Siega was more than happy to do different things, but was told he had to follow this formula because all late-90s/early-2000s Nu-Metal and Punk-ish music must be shot this way. We’ll get to Klasfeld tomorrow.

Siega has since gone on to direct TV shows, such as Dexter and The Vampire Diaries. However, his main thing now seems to be producing. In particular, all 45 episodes of The Following.

Ramsey Nickell shot this music video. He seems to have shot around 20 music videos. He’s also shot some TV movies, among other things.

Enjoy!