Horror on the Lens: Nosferatu (dir by F.W. Murnau)


Today’s Horror on the Lens is a classic film that really needs no introduction!  Released in 1922, the German silent film Nosferatu remains one of the greatest vampire films ever made.  It’s a film that we share every October and I’m happy to do so again this year!

Enjoy!

Horror on the Lens: Nosferatu (dir by F.W. Murnau)


Today’s Horror on the Lens is a classic film that really needs no introduction!  Released in 1922, the German silent film Nosferatu remains one of the greatest vampire films ever made.  It’s a film that we share every October and I’m happy to do so again this year!

Enjoy!

Horror Scenes That I Love: A Scene From Nosferatu


Today’s horror scene that I love comes from the absolutely terrifying 1922 silent film, Nosferatu.

Directed by F. W. Murnau and featuring Max Schreck as Count Orlock, Nosferatu is often cited as being the first vampire film.  That’s actually not true.  There were apparently film adaptations of Dracula that were produced years before Murnau gave the world his “unauthorized” adaptation.

However, I do think it can be argued that Nosferatu is the most influential vampire film ever made.  Every vampire movie released over the past 95 years has been a direct descendant of Nosferatu and it remains a truly nightmarish work of horror art.  One need only compare it to Universal’s first Dracula film to see how well Nosferatu has aged.

Enjoy this terrifying scene!

Horror on the Lens: Nosferatu (dir by F.W. Murnau)


Today’s Horror on the Lens is a classic film that really needs no introduction!  Released in 1922, the German silent film Nosferatu remains one of the greatest vampire films ever made.  It’s a film that we share every October and I’m happy to do so again this year!

(As well, since I’m going to be reviewing Dracula later today, it seems especially appropriate to start things off with Nosferatu.)

Enjoy!

Horror on the Lens: Nosferatu (dir by F.W. Murnau)


Today’s Horror on the Lens is a classic film that really needs no introduction!  Released in 1922, the German silent film Nosferatu remains one of the greatest vampire films ever made.  It’s a film that we share every October and I’m happy to do so again this year!

Enjoy!

 

Horror on the Lens: Nosferatu (dir by F.W. Murnau)


Nosferatuposter

This isn’t the first time that we’ve shared the classic 1922 silent vampire film Nosferatu here on the Lens but who cares?  It’s not only one of the most influential films ever made but it’s also something of a Halloween tradition around these parts!  Directed by the great German expressionist F.W. Muranu and featuring an iconic performance from Max Schreck, Nosferatu is a film that everyone should see at least once.

And here’s your chance!

 

Horror Film Review: Nosferatu (dir. by F.W. Murnau)


Since I previously “presented” our readers with The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, it’s only appropriate to now present another early horror film — F.W. Murnau’s classic silent vampire film, Nosferatu.  Much like Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu requires a bit of patience from modern audiences that take intrusive sound and CGI as a given.  And much like Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu rewards the patience.  Everything from Murnau’s moody use of shadow to Max Schreck’s performance as Orlock adds up to create one of the most influential and iconic films of all time.  And while the film itself might not feature the “jump out your seat scares” that modern audiences expect (and demand) from horror films, the image of Schreck’s creeping shadow remains effectively creepy and nightmarish.  Like all great horror, this is a film full of images that stick with you after you view it.

I am also very aware of both Werner Herzog’s excellent 1980 remake and the Oscar-nominated Shadow of the Vampire.  However, I’m kinda typing all this up at work so those two films will have to wait for a later date.  For now, if you have 84 minutes to kill and seriously, who doesn’t?, please enjoy F.W. Murnau’s classic Nosferatu