Gun Brothers (1956, directed by Sidney Salkow)


In this western, Buster Crabbe plays Chad Santee, a former Calvary officer who has traveled to Wyoming so he can visit his brother Jubal (Neville Brand) and see Jubal’s ranch.  Traveling by stagecoach, Chad meets and falls in love with a saloon singer named Rose Fargo (Ann Robinson).  When the stagecoach is held up by outlaws and one of them steals Rose’s broach, Chad decides to track the outlaws down.  What Chad doesn’t know is that Jubal is one of those outlaws.

Gun Brothers is an entertaining B-western.  There’s nothing surprising about the story but Buster Crabbe is a believable hero and Ann Robinson gets a chance to show off her saloon singing skills.  Neville Brand steals the film as Jubal.  Before going into acting, Brand was a highly decorated World War II combat officer and he brought his real-life toughness to every role that he played.  He could throw a punch and shoot a gun with an authority that few other actors could match.  Jubal, like Brand, has obviously seen and experienced things that his self-righteous brother will never be able to understand and, as a result, he’s not as tied down to the laws of society as everyone else.   Also turning in good performances are Michael Ansara as an outlaw and Lita Milan, as a Native American woman who is involved with the gang.

Not surprisingly, for a B-western, Gun Brothers is full of characters with names like Shawnee Jack, Yellowstone Kelly, Blackjack Silk, and Moose McClain.  It’s a simple movie but one that will be enjoyed by fans of old fashioned western action.

It’s Mini Kus! Time Again : “Sufficient Lucidity” By Tommi Parrish (Mini Kus! #91)


Ryan C.'s Four Color Apocalypse

I assure you, it’s not a contractual obligation — my decision to cover everything that comes out as part of the long-running Mini Kus! series from Latvian art comics publisher Kus! is entirely voluntary. In fact, not to step too far “out of chracter,” but each new foursome of releases is one of the “events” in the comics world that I look forward to most — as a critic, yes, but even more importantly as a reader. I never know what I’ll find between the covers of one of these minis, but I always know it will be something challenging, something unexpected, and something that not only stands up to, but frankly demands multiple close and considered readings.

Their latest “round,” so to speak, exemplifies this standard perhaps more than any other — seriously, there’s not a misfire in the bunch — so if you’ll permit me (and you…

View original post 618 more words

Music Video Of The Day: Dear Prudence, covered by Siouxsie and The Banshees (1983, dir by Tim Pope)


Happy birthday, Erin Nicole!

To be honest, the main reason that I picked this for today’s music video of the day is because Erin and I both love this song and it’s one that we’ve both listened to several times of the past few months.  (When you’re basically stuck inside for the majority of the year, you really do come to appreciate good music.)  Add to that, this song always makes me think of my sister, even if she isn’t listening to it with me.  The sun is beautiful and so is she. As I always say, one of the best things about being involved with TSL is that I get to work with my sister.   She’s always been there for me.  She’s always put up with me, even when I was at my worse.  I don’t know where I’d be without her.

This, of course, is a cover of a Beatles song.  If you think you spotted The Cure’s Robert Smith in this video, you are correct.  At the time this song was recorded (and this video made), Robert Smith was temporarily a member of the band.  This video was filmed in Venice, which is a wonderful city that I hope I get to once again visit with everyone who I care about.

Enjoy!