Are You Scared Of Snakes?


Snakes!

Unknown Artist

Are you scared of snakes?  If so, you’re not alone.  According to 2001 Gallup Poll, 56% of Americans said they were scared of snakes.  By comparison, only 45% of Americans said they were scared of public speaking while 41% said heights.  Only 36% said they were scared of spiders and only 7% were frightened by the prospect of going to the doctor.

There are nearly 3,000 different species of snakes in the world and only 25% of them are poisonous.  Most snakes are harmless and even the poisonous ones usually won’t strike as long as they’re left alone.  But people will always be scared of snakes.  The sound of a hiss is enough to send most people into a panic.

Back in the pulp era, snakes used to regularly appear on the covers of magazines and paperbacks, often being held by a cultist or threatening a bound victim.  When it comes to pulp art, snakes are never good news.  Take a look:

Artist Unknown

Artist Unknown

by Ed Valigursky

by Hans Wesselowski

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

Unknown Artist

by Rudolph Belarski

by Griffith Foxley

by John Pedersen

 

It’s The End Of The World!: Pulp Art of the Apocalypse


The end of the world has always been a popular subject, as you can tell by looking at the artwork below.  Some of these were done for magazines and some of them for paperbacks but what they all have in common is that they deal with the end of the world as we know it.

Presented for your consideration, pulp art of the apocalypse:

by Robert Gibson Jones

by Ed Valigursky

by Barye Philips

Artist Unknown

Artist Unknown, suspected to be Ralph Brillhart

by Ralph Brillhart

by Ralph Brillhart

Artist Unknown

by Ralph Brillhart

Artist Unknown

by Frank R. Paul

by Frank R. Paul

by Sam Peffer

by Robert McGinnis

Artist Unknown

by Hubert Rogers

Art Profile: The Covers of Fantastic Adventures


Fantastic Adventures was an extremely successful and influential pulp magazine that was published from 1939 to 1953.  They published a combination of fantasy, horror, and adventure, all distinguished by a more light-hearted approach than some of the other pulp magazines of the era.

Even better, Fantastic Adventures was one of the few pulp magazines to give proper credit to its cover artists:

by Harold W. McCauley

by Ed Valigursky

by Raymond Naylor

by Robert Gibson Jones

by Stockton Mulford

by Harold W. McCauley

by Robert Gibson Jones

by Rod Ruth

by Walter Parke

by Arnold Kohn