Music Video of the Day: Jive Talkin’ by The Bee Gees (1975, dir by ????)


Yes, everyone, I am still in a 70s-type of mood.  I imagine this will be the case for the rest of January.  Once February comes around, I’ll probably be in a Canadian mood so get ready for a lot of songs off of the Degrassi soundtrack.

Anyway, this video is for Jive Talkin’, which was I guess one of the Bee Gees’s earliest disco songs.  (Apparently, they were originally a non-disco band, which I just can’t imagine what that was like.  Yes, I know that it would be very easy for me to listen to their non-disco music.  That’s not the point.  The 70s are all about disco and dancing.  The 70s didn’t need any folk rock.)  Jive Talkin’ is one of those songs that feels like it should have been written for the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack but it actually came out two years before that film appeared in theaters.  That said, it does appear in Saturday Night Fever.  Unfortunately, the song did not appear in Stayin’ Alive.  That’s a shame since that film was all about jive and I think Frank Stallone could have done wonders with it.

Enjoy!

It’s just your jive talkin’
You’re telling me lies, yeah
Jive talkin’
You wear a disguise
Jive talkin’
So misunderstood, yeah
Jive talkin’
You really no good
 
Oh, my child
You’ll never know
Just what you mean to me
Oh, my child
You got so much
You’re gonna take away my energy
 
With all your jive talkin’
You’re telling me lies, yeah
Good lovin’
Still gets in my eyes
Nobody believes what you say
It’s just your jive talkin’
That gets in the way
 
Oh my love
You’re so good
Treating me so cruel
There you go
With your fancy lies
Leavin’ me lookin’
Like a dumbstruck fool
With all your
 
Jive talkin’
You’re telling me lies, yeah
Jive talkin’
You wear a disguise
Jive talkin’
So misunderstood, yeah
Jive talkin’
You just ain’t no good
 
Love talkin’
Is all very fine, yeah
Jive talkin’
Just isn’t a crime
And if there’s somebody
You’ll love till you die
Then all that jive talkin’
Just gets in your eye
 
Jive talkin’
You’re telling me lies, yeah
Good lovin’
Still gets in my eyes
Nobody believes what you say
It’s just your jive talkin’
That gets in the way
 
Love talkin’
Is all very fine, yeah
Jive talkin’, just isn’t a crime
And if there’s somebody
You’ll love till you die
Then all that jive talkin’
Just gets in your eye, yeah yeah
 
Oh jive talkin’
Jive talkin’
Oh jive talkin’

Music Video of the Day: Love Me by Yvonne Elliman (1976, dir by ????)


For the past few days, I have been driving everyone around the TSL Compound crazy by continually playing and re-playing the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack.  Though no one will admit it, I’m sure that they’ve all got the lyrics of I Can’t Have You memorized by now.  We could probably start a Bee Gees cover band if we wanted to.  And really, there’s no reason why we shouldn’t!  Leonard can play bass, I’ll sing, Jeff can drum, Erin can play the sitar, it’ll be great!

Well, today, I thought maybe that we would take a break with another Bee Gees song that was covered by Yvonne Elliman, Love Me.  While the Bee Gees version of the song didn’t get much attention, Yvonne Elliman’s cover was a huge hit and it probably played a role in the Bee Gees later writing How Deep Is Your Love for her.  Of course, the Bee Gees later ended up performing How Deep Is Your Love for Saturday Night Fever while Yvonne recorded If I Can’t Have You.  It can be difficult to keep track but the important thing is that everyone got recorded eventually.

Enjoy!

Love me; just a little bit longer
Love me

I remember times my love when we really had it all
You were always there to make me smile, help me when I fall
Ooh, I can’t believe you’re leaving me
When there’s so much more to say – I can’t let you go
Ooh, every time I look at you I still can feel the glow
Let it be, let it grow

Love me please, just a little bit longer
Together we can make it
Our love is much too young to break it
Love me please, just a little bit harder
Together we can make it
Our love is much too young to break it

Ooh, all I ever wanted was to have you to myself
Then I see you standing there in the arms of someone else
Ooh, you know a girl can stand so much
And it’s more then I can bear – I can’t let you go
Ooh, every time I look at you I still can feel the glow
Let it be, let it grow

Love me please, just a little bit longer
Together we can make it
Our love is much too young to break it
Love me please, just a little bit harder

Never even try to see things my way
It’s hard on a woman when love ain’t no love at all
And when you walk away – you probably will
You’re gonna be sorry, I’m begging you; please

Love me please, just a little bit longer
Together we can make it
Our love is much too young to break it
Love me please, just a little bit harder
Together we can make it
Our love is much too young to break it
Love me please, just a little bit longer
Together we can make it
Our love is much too young to break it

Music Video of the Day: Night Fever by Bee Gees (1978, dir by ????)


Seeing as how I’ve spent the first few days of 2022 sharing music videos for danceable hits of the 70s, you had to know that I was eventually going to get to this one.  The name of the song is Night Fever and not, as is often incorrectly assumed, Saturday Night Fever.  Saturday Night Fever was the movie for which this song was recorded.  Night Fever indicates that the fever can hit any night, not just on a Saturday.

This video was apparently shot in 1978 but the Bee Gees didn’t release it until 2004.  I’m not sure why that is.  Perhaps all of the seedy motels gave the wrong impression about what the band was singing about.  Or maybe they just decided that John Travolta in that white suit was a better visual representation for what the Bee Gees were all about.  I will note that the same year this video was produced, the Bee Gees appeared in Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band so, obviously, they weren’t too concerned with looking slightly silly.

The video was shot in Sunny Isles Beach, Florida.  Supposedly, most of these motels have since been torn down.  That’s a shame as I think every resort town needs to have at least one strong row of seedy motels.  When my family lived in Colorado, we lived just a block away from some of the seediest motels known to man and whenever we would go back to visit our cousins in Colorado, I would always make it a point to see if the motels were still there.  They were.  They probably still are.  It’s been a while since I’ve been to Colorado.

Anyway, it’s a good song.  If it doesn’t make you want to dance, I don’t know what to say.  You may just not be a dancer.  But it’s never too late to learn!

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: I Started A Joke by Bee Gees (1968, directed by Jean-Christophe Averty)


“This is a very spiritual song. The listeners have to interpret it themselves – trying to explain it would detract from the song.”

— Robin Gibb on I Started A Joke

“When he passed away we went out, they took the equipment away and we came back in. I picked up my phone and found ‘I Started A Joke’ on YouTube and played it. I put the phone on his chest and that was the first time I broke down. I knew that song and its lyrics were perfect for that moment. That song will always have new meaning to me now.”

— Robin-Jon Gibb, son of Robin Gibb, discussing his father’s death

Of course, this song really isn’t about a joke. Instead, it’s told from the point of view of someone who has unintentionally said something so wrong and/or offensive that it has lost him all of his friends. When he tries to laugh it off, they get upset at him for not taking it seriously. When he gets upset over being abandoned, they laugh at his pain.

This music video, from 1968, features Robin Gibb singing the song while surrounded by laughter, tears, and questions marks. The video was filmed in Brussels by French television director Jean-Christophe Averty and originally aired as a part of the Idea TV Special, a Bee Gees-centered program that aired in Europe.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: Stayin’ Alive by Bee Gees (1989, dir by ????)


Are they Bee Gees or are they The Bee Gees?  I’m not really sure and, quite frankly, I’ve seen it listed as both on several reputable sites.  Regardless, this is a good song.  “The New York Times‘ effect on man” is a nice and random little lyric, even though Tony Manero really didn’t come across like a reader of the Times in Saturday Night Fever.

If you’re ever giving someone CPR, they say that you should do it to the tune of Staying Alive so, if you memorize this song, you’ll be able to save a life.  That’s the type of helpful information that we happily provide to our readers free of charge here at the Shattered Lens.

According to the YouTube description, this from the “One for All Tour” Live concert at the National Tennis Centre in Melbourne 1989, Australia.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: Stayin’ Alive by Bee Gees (1977, dir. ???)


I did the well-known version of Stayin’ Alive yesterday, so here’s the other version. Going off of Wikipedia again, there were three videos that were shot for Saturday Night Fever (1977). However, they were put aside in favor of reshooting them in California when Barry grew his beard back. That’s why you can see him without his beard in this one.

You can also see him without his beard for Night Fever, which, to the best of my knowledge, is also one of the three original videos.

This is the kind of video you think of when someone tells you there is a music video for Stayin’ Alive. It uses quite a few video effects that I can’t say I care for.

They fit the disco sound, but Bee Gees were always more than disco. Go listen to the song New York Mining Disaster 1941 or Lonely Days. I think the other video fits them better than this one.

If you want to see these kind of effects used well, then I recommend the video for Knock On Wood by Amii Stewart.

Regardless, I’m glad this video is out there. It shows more of the kind of style that was used in the 1970s. It helps one to understand where some directors were coming from when they entered the MTV-era. They did more than just concert videos.

Enjoy!

Music Video of the Day: Stayin’ Alive by Bee Gees (1977, dir. Bruce Gowers)


It’s hard enough when there are multiple versions of a video. It’s tough dealing with videos–officially posted or not–disappearing. This is a new one on me. Count it off!

1. The official beegees YouTube account posting:

2. The Rhino YouTube account posting:

3. The BeeGeesVEVO YouTube account posting:

They’re all the exact same video–no difference in runtime or quality. And yes, there is a second version of Stayin’ Alive as you might have gathered from the title of the VEVO account posting.

As for the content of the music video…this is a really upbeat song and the title is Stayin’ Alive…have them wander around abandoned sets at MGM Studios??? It reminds me of the video Gowers did for The First Cut Is The Deepest by Rod Stewart except there it made sense for him to be isolated on a staircase. They were probably just opportunistic since they filmed this video on the sets that were next-door to where Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1978) was being filmed. At least that’s what Wikipedia says.

I do like that whatever the reason, the video is showing us the opposite of what comes to mind when you go to put this video on. Also, it’s a testament to Gowers’ talent as a director. Back in the 1970s, he could do something for the Bee Gees, Journey, The Rolling Stones, and he’s the one who did Bohemian Rhapsody for Queen. Cut to the early-1980s and you can still his style at work. Sometimes it made for a funny, but memorable video, like Eye Of The Tiger by Survivor. Other times you got Separate Ways (Worlds Apart) by Journey. I’ll talk about that video at some point since that also brings in ABBA, a famous Italian director, and Bohemian Rhapsody–at the very least.

Enjoy!

Song of the Day: Stayin’ Alive (by Bee Gees)


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The last week or so we’ve seen Lisa Marie review two films which shares a close connection with the latest “Song of the Day.”

First there was her review of Saturday Night Fever by John Badham. Then she follows it up with the so very awful, but mesmerizing sequel by Sylvester Stallone, Staying Alive. The original film had as part of it’s disco-based soundtrack the song “Stayin’ Alive” by the group Bee Gees. The sequel literally borrows the song’s title and just runs with it.

The song itself has become not just a classic, but has also become part of pop culture both good and bad. It’s been portrayed as a great example of the disco-scene of the mid-to-late 70’s, but also become a sort of a joke to some.

No matter where one stands on the merits of this song it’s one hell of a catchy one. No matter how much we all fail every guy will try to hit the high notes achieved by Barry Gibbs. We never succeed, but we never fail not to try over and over as we sing along.

Stayin’ Alive

Well, you can tell by the way I use my walk
I’m a woman’s man, no time to talk
Music loud and women warm,
I’ve been kicked around since I was born

And now it’s all right, it’s OK
And you may look the other way
We can try to understand
The New York times effect on man

Whether you’re a brother or whether you’re a mother
You’re stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive
Feel the city breaking and everybody shaking
And were stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive
Ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive
Ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin’ alive

Well now, I get low and I get high
And if I can’t get either, I really try
Got the wings of heaven on my shoes
I’m a dancing man and I just can’t lose
You know it’s all right, it’s ok
I’ll live to see another day
We can try to understand
The New York times effect on man

Whether you’re a brother or whether you’re a mother
You’re stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive
Feel the city breakin and everybody shakin
And were stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive
Ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive
Ah, ha, ha, ha, stayin’ alive

Life going nowhere, somebody help me
Somebody help me, yeah
Life going nowhere, somebody help me
Somebody help me, yeah.
Stayin’ alive