Song of the Day: Django (by Luis Bacalov)


So, over the weekend I was finally able to catch the latest from Quentin Tarantino. To say that I enjoyed Django Unchained would be an understatement. Review of the film will be coming forthwith. One thing I really loved about this film was how Tarantino continues to pay homage to the very films he has used to inspire the ones he himself makes. This is clearly evident when one hears the original title song from the original Django play out in the beginning of Django Unchained.

Simply titled “Django” this song was composed by Luis Bacalov with lyrics by Franco Migliacci and sung by Roberto Fia. For fans of the spaghetti western this song is just as iconic as those composed by Ennio Morricone for Sergio Leone’s “The Man With No Name” trilogy of spaghetti westerns. Where Ennio’s compositions were more in line with Leone’s more serious take on the Italian view of the western, Bacalov’s “Django” definitely has a much more grindhouse feel to it. It sounds like something that would be heard in a western, but also has that 60′s era folk rock sound.

For those who have been loving Tarantino’s spaghetti western should really go search out Sergio Corbucci’s original Django and also Bacalov’s score work.

Django

Chorus: django!

Django, have you always been alone?

Chorus: django!

Django, have you never loved again?
Love will live on, oh oh oh…
Life must go on, oh oh oh…
For you cannot spend your life regreatting.

Chorus: django!

Django, you must face another day.

Chorus: django!

Django, now your love has gone away.
Once you loved her, whoa-oh…
Now you’ve lost her, whoa-oh-oh-oh…
But you’ve lost her for-ever, django.

When there are clouds in the skies, and they are grey.
You may be sad but remember that love will pass away.

Oh django!
After the showers is the sun.
Will be shining…

[instrumental solo]

Once you loved her, whoa-oh…
Now you’ve lost her, whoa-oh-oh-oh…
But you’ve lost her for-ever, django.

When there are clouds in the skies, and they are grey.
You may be sad but remember that love will pass away.
Oh django!
After the showers is the sun.
Will be shining…
Django!
Oh oh oh django!
You must go on,
Oh oh oh django…

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4 responses to “Song of the Day: Django (by Luis Bacalov)

  1. One day, Quentin Tarantino will have an original idea.

    When he does, the shock will cause his head to literally explode.

    I hope he’s standing next to Robert Rodriguez when it happens.

    QT basically cuts and pastes old movies to make Frankesteinian films that are blatant rip-offs of old ideas. It’s totally different to the more subtle “referencing” achieved by other (superior) filmmakers.

    Movies would be more fun if Tarantino just stopped making ‘em.

    • Hmm, well thanks for sharing your thoughts on the song Django.

      While I have to admit that you’re right that Tarantino does love referencing films he loves, especially the old grindhouse and exploitation ones, I think you’re selling him short in that he’s doing a blatant rip-off of old ideas. Again this goes to the age-old argument that there’s even new ideas left to explore in the world of film storytelling that hasn’t already been told many times. From looking at his work the only one I actually thought he did a blatant rip-off of would be with Reservoir Dogs. Even the most ardent Tarantino fan would admit that film was nothing but an unofficial remake of Ringo Lam’s City on Fire.

      Of all of Tarantino’s films I think this one actually goes more in line with the sort of subtle referencing you speak of from other “superior” filmmakers. Outside of the title, the title song and a few visual homages to the original Django and to 1975′s Mandingo, Django Unchained seems very lacking in how Tarantino can get into a long-winded lovefest with his knowledge about film history. I don’t think any piece of dialogue in the film even references film history or even cuts and pastes sequences from the films he’s ripping off.

      I’m interested to know which films he ripped off to create Django Unchained.

      While I’m an admirer of Tarantino, I don’t consider myself in awe of the man. He does have his flaws as a filmmaker. One being he could get a bout of diarrhea of the mouth when it comes to certain dialogue sequences. Another being his penchant to insert himself into his films which has become a sort of a joke that’s both funny and distracting. But then again there’s a reason why he seems to be a polarizing figure in the industry. You either love him or hate him. I’m guessing from your comment it’s the latter and that’s a viable opinion though I will say that sometimes hate for the man can sometimes obscure and color one’s opinion on the quality of his films.

      I mean I’m not a huge fan of Terence Malick who I think has a diarrhea of the eyes when it comes to his films, but I can’t deny the fact that the man can compose and direct a film like it was a symphony.

      I also think that the original Django was a better film if just for it’s influence on the genre of spaghetti western and for having introduced Franco Nero to the world. I think even Lisa Marie would agree with me on that. Plus, any film that would have such a huge impact on the shonen scene in anime must be a great film, indeed.

  2. Actually…no! I’m not quite one of those people who thinks that everything that QT has ever done has been absolutely awful. Overrated? Certainly, but his films aren’t the worst that I’ve ever seen. Well, “Death Proof” was pretty horrible…so was “Kill Bill Part One”. I wouldn’t even say that I hate the man. I’m sure that there are more detestable people than QT in Hollywood. I actually do like that QT has enthusiasm for a wide array of films, especially those that might be dismissed by more “serious” critics. It’s sometimes great fun to listen to him talk about films. Alas, it’s less fun to watch the end product of his own filmic endeavours. But his films do have an awkward cut and paste quality. It’s just all so heavy handed.

    It may interest you to know that last year, the Brisbane International Film Festival had a massive retrospective of spaghetti westerns, including a couple of “Django” films. Plus the “Dollars” trilogy and a whole heap of Lee Van Cleef flicks including “Sabata”. Alas, I didn’t arrive in Brisbane until after the festival had ended.

    I don’t know about the “Django” song–it sounds more suited to a James Bond film. It’s almost as if Tom Jones ought to be singing it.

    • LOL, I actually thought it sounded like late 50′s to early 60′s Elvis. I think when compared to the more serious Morricone scores for Leone the one by Bacalov’s does seem out of place until you realize the era Django came out.

      Late 60′s saw a lot of soundtracks incorporate much of that era’s psychedelic and folk sound. I like how the lyrics of the song is pretty much a primer on the film’s character and the film’s plot.

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